Which phone is popular amongst NSA agent?s

Matthew Gomez
Matthew Gomez

They must be paranoid about spying. What special phone do you think they would be using?

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Camden Long
Camden Long

personally i think its the samsung sgh-x480c

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Zachary Harris
Zachary Harris

OK I will tell you. Here is how it works. They have one phone for their work and one for home. The law states that it is a criminal offence for them to use their work phone for any other purpose. In factthey have to dial a special number to get an outside line because they use different radio masts and have their own networks which can include satellite calls. However, if it were found they had called home or used it to do online shopping etc etc etc they would face a court martial if they were military and a secret tribunal if in the civillian wing

Jeremiah Howard
Jeremiah Howard

ok, jesus let me rephrase for autistic people.

WHICH PHONE DO NSA PEOPLE / DEEP STATE PEOPLE GET RECOMMENDED THROUGH THEIR CLOSE CIRCLE OF JEWS TO BUY FROM THE DARKNET ANONYMOUSLY SO THEY CAN KEEP THEIR TAIL CLEAR

fuck. did I stumble onto 4chan?

Lincoln Price
Lincoln Price

Most NSA "agents" are desk jockeys with office jobs making a public servant's salary. They use the same shit everybody else uses and resign themselves to being surveilled.

Do you mean CIA agents, of the sort engaged in clandestine work?

Leo Richardson
Leo Richardson

i would use a ham radio link to send voice data. of course it can't be encrypted.

Jordan Flores
Jordan Flores

Mr Gristlehead Bunched-Panties detected

I believe the iphone X is very popular,

Jaxon Wood
Jaxon Wood

What is the real level of access a cellphone network operator has to a phone? Do they have full out-of-band access to everything the user has access to (such as any data stored on the phone) plus low level access to functions that the user has no access to?

Nolan Taylor
Nolan Taylor

What special phone do you think they would be using?
Why the iPhone of course!
Only our most trusted ally can crack it's encryption!

Kayden Phillips
Kayden Phillips

they get the cheapest smartphone available, remove the roms on a hot air table and burn new roms in-house (and probably swap other chips too bought direct from the manufacturer), also they configure their own openvpn client,

Logan Scott
Logan Scott

Mr. Reddit show says it's some Android smartphone, probably Samshit. Applel btfo (toddlers xd)

Chase Jenkins
Chase Jenkins

The NSA would be using the Boeing Black phone.

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Nathan Lee
Nathan Lee

They are smart enough not to use any phone if they want to do illegal shit that they don’t want their employer to find out about. Nellie Ohr used ham radio to communicate with her treasonous contacts and receive her subversive orders. Otherwise it’d be a burner laptop with Tails at a McDonalds 40 Miles from home.

No phones though.

Wyatt Morgan
Wyatt Morgan

Nobody? Is this some sort of deep secret?

Nathaniel Miller
Nathaniel Miller

no, most aren't paranoid, just incompetent contractors like Snowclone

Luke White
Luke White

secret access
Occam's Razor tells me: not really, service providers are involved with baseband spooks but it's not as if AT&T is currently copying everything off your device as you use it. It's much easier to capture network traffic as it reaches routers and modems.
I can't tell for sure, and it wouldn't surprise me if I was wrong, but for the moment, there doesn't seem to be a need.

Luke Rogers
Luke Rogers

Where is it implied everything must reach your phone via a network connection that's controlled by a provider anyway? You can take pictures with your phone or record things or have songs or other files which you put onto the phone by connecting it to your computer via USB or bluetooth, can the provider access that data (otherwise inaccessible to them)?

Logan King
Logan King

Through the baseband the network operators likely have completely out-of-band access, even when the device is off.

Josiah Cox
Josiah Cox

A while back Samsung was busted sneaking baseband access into Android, so that the baseband processor could access the phone even when off ala the Intel Management Engine. There’s no reason to suspect things have changed and it’s likely this kind of access is required by law for consumer devices. Probably one of the many secret laws they passed since 911.

Kayden Ross
Kayden Ross

samsung galaxy S2 with replicant burned onto the ROM with what mentioned. Though even that is still not perfect security, but it is enough to bypass bullshit from the cell carrier on the baseband firmware and keep it opensource at that. Only problem is it only supports 3G last I checked.

Ayden Baker
Ayden Baker

retarded halfchan nigger doesn't understand how a fucking cell phone works
Go ahead and use the CIA nigger phones, you stupid fuck. You're still operating on civilian networks, so it's insecure. You gonna make a thread about how secure your Libreturd ChinkPad is when you hook it to the unprotected Starbucks network? Fuck you, faggot cunt. Get lost.

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James Thomas
James Thomas

More tech illiteracy. Stop blabbing about things you're utterly ignorant of, fuckheads. Everything from the boot ROM to the system storage is all EEPROM in any modern computer. Every bit of firmware from radios to EFI bootloaders can just be rewritten from a bootloader mode or can be manually reprogrammed with a common hardware debugging interface like JTAG or ISP, with the latter being more common on mobile ARM devices (AKA chinkshit).

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Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin

I have one of those portable furnaces lying around somewhere

Jacob Adams
Jacob Adams

but my libreturd chinkpad doesn't connect to public wifi. i put my card in monitor mode to sniff the niggers that do though.

David Flores
David Flores

What special phone do you think they would be using?
Look in your pocket and tell me.
/thread

number station with OTP

Blake Cook
Blake Cook

of course it can't be encrypted.
But transmissions can be encoded, if your intention is not to conceal it ;-)

AFAIK, a link mast can tell a cell phone to turn off encryption, for example.

Camden Edwards
Camden Edwards

ISP
It's SPI, brainlet. JTAG can't be used to flash chips ,either.

Ethan Cruz
Ethan Cruz

None. They don't have access to the phone.

Turn off encryption
Not on the device storage, just for a call. I don't believe this one anyway.

Sebastian Gutierrez
Sebastian Gutierrez

No such thing as a safe phone. Every phone including dumb phones has GPS in them because of the (((E911))) laws. Best you can do is burner phones you discard often. Turn them off/remove battery when not in use.

Jacob Stewart
Jacob Stewart

GPS
GPS isn't the problem. Obtaining your position via GPS is a completely anonymous process.

Nathan Ross
Nathan Ross

you think too highly of them. One of the top FBI agents charged with tracking down traitors and acting foreign espionage agents was using an unencrypted iPhone to talk to his his Jewish mistress about bringing down a duly elected us president.

It's not the 1950s anymore, where all the intel agent recruits came from Princeton old money and saw it as a patriotic duty. These same types are now hedgefunders who have become camp followers of the rootless jews and willingly work against their own nation economically if it means they get to keep a swiss ski chalet and spent their summers in Sardinia.

Jordan Lewis
Jordan Lewis

I imagine CIA niggers don't have to hide much. Typical weekend would include collecting child porn and scheduling that cocaine drop from colombia in the middle of Arkansas.

For work stuff they most likely have their own segmented network for phone calls/web communication. After all the government did create the internet, DARPA net. Not including TOR.

Dylan Ortiz
Dylan Ortiz

But transmissions can be encoded, if your intention is not to conceal it ;-)
This. Elliptical conversation is great. Even when they're listening in, they still don't know what you're actually saying. Bin Laden used this for years. They'd be listening to his cell phone conversations, and couldn't figure out what the fuck he was actually talking about.

Aiden Bell
Aiden Bell

reprogramming hardware that's back-doored
That's for the advice, and the selfie

James Evans
James Evans

Title 47 CFR Part 15
You are like a little baby.

Colton Kelly
Colton Kelly

Not including TOR.
UGHHH.....newfags, it's written as "Tor."

Jason Gutierrez
Jason Gutierrez

Well, aekteully...
Modern chips sometimes almost always have "bootloaders" (that's what the thing is called you are referring to) that grant the user/software/hardware-master ability to flash a new firmware onto the selected region using different tools: external flash memory and various protocols. But those exact bootloaders are located in far-away chips that won't get started if they were overwritten and most of the time they have a special protected region which can't be erased using regular tools (JTAG will do). So: flashing a ROM using I2C/SPI flasher is useless.
Also: no protected communication, except relativity-based one (also not promised to work securely, thanks to gray state fagolas).

Almost there, arduino boy! NO.
JTAG is the most common protocol that is currently used to flash almost every chip on the market (even modern cpus have this exact protocol pinout). I still can easily name its pins from the top of my head: TMS, TCK, TDI, TDO. It's preferable because (most of manufacturers) allow in-system debug using specifically this type of protocol, which also allows to use clocks such as: (CPU_Clock >> 4), allowing you (if you pick short wires and have good hw buffers) speed up to 10MHz which is okay for most applications. Also modern mcus allow taking a "snapshot" (if you add a (while(1)) line in the HWFailure_Handler) of their failure state, which can be later viewed using JTAG. In short: JTAG allows to view and control most(sometimes all of it) of peripheral of a given mcu.
Cortex (f.e. ST Cortex-M0/M3) still sometimes uses I2C-styled SWD programming protocol with the following lines: SWDIO (data in-out) and SWCLK (data clock). It's slow, outdated and generally not recommended if you are to write firmware bigger than just a led flasher.
AVR (now owned by filthy pajeet microchip) uses "AVR ISP" on their 8-bit series. Not a bad mcu for a starter, but now is in a process of being eaten alive by pajeets and chinks. Looks like pajeet ceo paid chink to produce shit quality atmega8/16 in grand mass, which lowers users opinion about once great mcu. Attiny10/8 series uses I2C-styled "Micro-programming interface".
Microchip 8-bits SUCK BALLS. 2 BLOODY CYCLES PER OP! AND EVEN THAT IS NOT PROMISED! Also GIANT LIST OF 20 OP CODES! WHO THE FUCK WOULD USE THAT?!

It's SPI, brainlet
Not entirely correct, previous cool arduino boy meant "AVR ISP", which is in-system programming; it looks like usual "spi" (thanks to reset, mosi, miso and sclk), but you have to give up additional software overhead to flash simple 24C02 using "AVR ISP".
JTAG can't be used to flash chips
JTAG CAN'T BE USED TO FLASH
CIA NIGGER! GIT OUT
I SWEAR ON ME MUM
IM GONNA FLASH MAH FIRMWARE IN YOUR ASS
AND DEBUG IT ON THE FLY

P.S.: Score 2 for the good guys.

John Hall
John Hall

He asked what phone they used. The illiterate pajeets of Holla Forums replied with non-sequiter about phone masts and networks.

Holla Forums is worse than /g/. 4/g/ might be full of programmer socks and mouth-breathing weed-Windows /v/irgins on MSI gaymen laptops, but fuck if I've ever seen a VOIP thread ruined by a sperg who doesn't want to share his IP address with others hosts anywhere other than 8/tech/.

Luke Jackson
Luke Jackson

Don't you need physical access for JTAG?

Jayden Moore
Jayden Moore

I have never heard of flashing something over a JTAG interface using a JTAG debugger.

You usually need physical access for SPI, too.

Adam Green
Adam Green

What would set apart a JTAG "debugger" from a JTAG "programmer / flasher"?
I've been able to program my CPLDs using a homemade JTAG interface just fine.

Ethan Wright
Ethan Wright

CPLD isn't a ROM chip

Bentley Nelson
Bentley Nelson

This, based on what I've read in crime books the US government has had the ability to track mobile devices accurately to a 10 foot radius since the late 90s

Benjamin Collins
Benjamin Collins

You don't have to dig in to crime books to find proof of this. This is a published spec and part of Enhanced 9-1-1 (aka E911). It is all right there in the open.

The GPS chip is part of the baseband radio and not the same GPS chip that the end user can control. "Rooting" the phone or anything else can not disable the E911 capabilities. Even a phone with out active service can call 911 be be interrogated by the the E911 system. You have no way of knowing when/how many times your phone was "pinged" (Interrogated) by the network.
Remember. This is all
FOR YOUR SAFETY
Even the dumbest of dumb phones supports E911 and networks are fined if they do not force this.
fiercewireless.com/wireless/sprint-alltel-usc-fined-for-missed-e911-deadline
The only way to stop E911 is to turn it off and remove the battery. It's totally Pure Coincidence most phones at all price points are now being designed with non-removable batteries.
The fall back is PRS (old school triangulation) and also part of the E911 spec. So even if you externally spoof the GPS location that will set off alarm bells because the GPS location wont jive with the cell towers your handset is affiliated to. You don't have to take my word on any of this. Just dig around the E911 specifications and mandates that where placed on the cell networks starting around 2001.
They didn't have to force the public to install tracking device on themselves. They tricked everyone in carrying tracking devices voluntarily and even got the goyim to PAY FOR IT THEMSELVES.

Came out in 2005 and thus E911 compliant. You would have to go back to the 1990's to find a non-E911 compliant phone and your network choices would be very, very limited. NO carrier will activate it.

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