Nipponese Learning Thread: 虫 Edition

Bentley Smith
Bentley Smith

So, you wanna learn the Nipponese, huh? Well, you've come to the right thread. You know the drill; All of the relevant resources are available below. It's not an official list or anything, just an OP I threw together from items taken from previous threads. If you have any suggestions on how this list can be improved, then please don't hesitate to say something.

I'm completely new, where do I start?
Learn the Kana. Start with Hiragana and then move on to Katakana. Yes, you need both, and yes stroke order is important. Use Realkana or Kana Invaders for spaced repetition. Alternatively, you can use the Anki deck, but I'd recommend the first two. Tae Kim has a Kana diagram on his website, and you can use KanjiVG for pretty much any character.

Alright, I know the Kana. Now what?
You have to learn vocabulary and grammar in order to speak and understand the language. Some will tell you to grind the Core2k/6k deck until you're blue in the face, others will tell you that grammar is more important. Truth is, you need both, but it doesn't really matter which one you decide to do first. You're teaching yourself here, so you move at your own pace and do what you're most receptive to. If you want grammar first, then Tae Kim has a great introductory grammar guide, there are numerous grammar related videos in user's all-in-one-Anki-package, IMABI has an active forums and an abundance of information on grammar, and there's always YouTube if you're lazy. On the other hand, if you want to learn vocab first, then grab the Core2k/6k and grind until you're blue in the face. For mnemonics, see Kanji Damage.

Well this is great and everything, but I still need more help
That's what these threads are for aside from the obligatory shitposting. You shouldn't assume that anyone here knows more than you, but there are anons here who are willing to help. Try to find shit out on your own, for fuck's sake, but if you're stumped, then maybe someone will have something to say that can point you in the right direction.

Threadly reminder:
YOU CAN LEARN JAPANESE

[Resources]
old DJT guide: docs.google.com/document/d/1H8lw5gnep7B_uZAbHLfZPWxJlzpykP5H901y6xEYVsk/edit#
new DJT guide: djtguide.neocities.org/
pastebin.com/w0gRFM0c

[Anki and Decks]
Anki: apps.ankiweb.net/
Core 2k/6k: mega.nz/#!QIQywAAZ!g6wRM6KvDVmLxq7X5xLrvaw7HZGyYULUkT_YDtQdgfU
Core2k/6k content: core6000.neocities.org/
user's Japanese Learner Anki package: mega.nz/#!14YTmKjZ!A_Ac110yAfLNE6tIgf5U_DjJeiaccLg3RGOHVvI0aIk
<This is a .zip file with a number of Anki decks and a number of books on grammar, including
<Japanese the Manga Way
<Tae Kim's guide to Japanese Grammar
<Remembering the Kanji vol 1, 2 and 3 (mnemonic exercises)
<A Dictionary of basic, intermediate, and advanced Japanese grammar
<An Anki deck that contains the Visualizing Japanese Grammar video series, a deck for Kana, a deck for Kanji and vocab, and a deck version of the DoJG book
KanjiDamage deck: ankiweb.net/shared/info/748570187
Kodansha's Kanji Learner's Course deck: ankiweb.net/shared/info/779483253

[Websites, Apps, and Books]
RealKana: realkana.com/
Kana Invaders: learnjapanesepod.com/kana-invaders/
Genki I and II (2nd Edition): mega.nz/#!aBF1TJYJ!D7Lkamt_oa6QlkMX4k0e7nDRu3qwacyyuoyxvbSego8
<The zip's password is "cant"
Forvo.com: ja.forvo.com/
Mainichi.me: mainichi.me/
Rikaichan: polarcloud.com/rikaichan/
GoogleIME: google.com/ime/
KanjiVG: kanji.sljfaq.org/kanjivg.html
IMABI: imabi.net/
Tae Kim's Guide to Japanese: guidetojapanese.org/learn/
KanjiDamage: kanjidamage.com/
KANJI-Link radicals: kanji-link.com/en/kanji/radicals/
Japanese Audiobooks: how-to-learn-any-language.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=6241&PN=1&TPN=1
All Japanese All The Time: alljapaneseallthetime.com/blog/all-japanese-all-the-time-ajatt-how-to-learn-japanese-on-your-own-having-fun-and-to-fluency/
Erin.ne.jp: erin.ne.jp/en/lesson01/index.html
R.A. Miller's A Japanese Reader: mega.nz/#!aNoHDBRa!1q_JZWZnktl16rWZsSz1PHUxQbTvi5UU_VpSIogzxO8
Jisho: jisho.org
Japanese Google Dictionary: dictionary.goo.ne.jp/

[YouTube Videos]
Namasensei: youtube.com/watch?v=nqJ5wU4FamA&list=PL9987A659670D60E0
JapanesePod101: youtube.com/user/japanesepod101/videos
KANJI-Link: youtube.com/watch?v=nOXuIYVzyL4&list=PLE6S_Q0SX_mBtzG17ho7YER6vmzCPJ3B4
Japanese Ammo with Misa: youtube.com/channel/UCBSyd8tXJoEJKIXfrwkPdbA/playlists
Japanese VideoCast: youtube.com/user/LingoVideocast/videos

Other urls found in this thread:

insidescanlation.com/etc/How-to-edit-manga-with-Photoshop/rawr/editguide/2.html
forum.jphip.com/index.php?topic=17255.320
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/particlesintro
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_kana_orthography
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/adjectives_ex
ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/産卵管
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/adjectives
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/surunaru#Using_with_i-adjectives
polarcloud.com/getrcx/
mega.nz/#!DgZ2FQJZ!_-pz6mV8QG4u1lpC9wfH-NJ0YACy7iw_LL3Ls0_W6VA
kanji.reader.bz/
volafile.org/get/o4dgqpViGTvM/kodansha-kanji-learners-course-pdf.pdf
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_counter_word

Gavin White
Gavin White

What is どーすりゃ in the 5th picture an abbreviation for? I can understand the rest of it just fine but that's tripping me up.

Nicholas Moore
Nicholas Moore

It's gotta be どうする or どうすれば. It doesn't make sense for it to be anything else.

Hudson Long
Hudson Long

yeah, どうすれば makes the most sense

John Martin
John Martin

Bump. Do people in Japan celebrate Halloween?

Joshua Phillips
Joshua Phillips

Three days in and I've almost memorized Hirigana, so that's cool. Even though I don't know any vocab yet, it's neat to at least be able to recognize the characters.

Parker Ramirez
Parker Ramirez

I don't think anyone actually goes door to door in costume and gets candy, but they do like to make themed shit around it, sweets and art and the like.

Alexander Morris
Alexander Morris

Friendly reminder.

Ian Green
Ian Green

They have the biggest celebration of Halloween on Earth at Shibuya. They like to dress as freaks and such.

Charles Lopez
Charles Lopez

Duolingo's Japanese course has been released, will you give it a try?
Why not
<Pic related
Why would anyone ever recommend this shit?

Camden Gutierrez
Camden Gutierrez

I never met anyone who completely learned a language from duolingo, but I especially can't imagine Japanese being the least bit learn-able on a platform like that.

Parker Stewart
Parker Stewart

Besides this, Duolingo operates on a counter-scientific philosophy that is objectively worse for learning a language vs the usual way.

Jaxson Allen
Jaxson Allen

I've been thinking of trying to learn nip again. I tried sometime ago and learned Hiragana and Katakana and some grammar. Visual stuff is really useful to me. Is Duolingo so bad to use alongside other things?

Jonathan Hernandez
Jonathan Hernandez

The only reason to use it is to have things to practice but it will probably be in a different order than whatever else your using and it won't let you progress until you learn those things. And there's better ways to practice too.

Tyler Cooper
Tyler Cooper

u bitch

Aaron Wilson
Aaron Wilson

Sorry to ask a meta question, but why are Japanese learning threads here instead of /a/ or something?

Hudson Sullivan
Hudson Sullivan

Holla Forums is the only board that isn't completely dead on this entire website

Owen Peterson
Owen Peterson

Japanese is the language of vidya.

Julian Johnson
Julian Johnson

video started in the west, fuck off you disgusting weeb shit.

Chase Lopez
Chase Lopez

the west invents a lot of things but it takes a nation of pure people who aren't being replaced by the work of the merchant to realize its potential. we had some guys like nolan bushnell, but thats an era gone by.

Jordan Sanders
Jordan Sanders

you truly are a retarded weeaboo

Owen Campbell
Owen Campbell

Because they were started with the express purpose of learning Japanese to play video games, especially after the frequency of censorship in the localization phase became well-known. The actual motivations of individuals itt may vary significantly.

Aaron Williams
Aaron Williams

you are a truly retarded westerner

Robert Sanchez
Robert Sanchez

So if i translate something, is it easy enough to get someone to typeset it or is better just to learn it myself?

I'm currently translating some hentai, but I have no idea if it's something I should learn myself.

Adrian Johnson
Adrian Johnson

It can't be that hard to do it yourself.

Joseph Butler
Joseph Butler

Is there any simple Japanese stuff I can read that'll teach me the basics?

I know Hiragana and Kata but I need something to kick me off reading.

Jayden Murphy
Jayden Murphy

Is there any simple Japanese stuff I can read that'll teach me the basics?

Nope because the language is designed around the kanji with the hiragana and katakana to compliment it. Even in media that are released in full katakana/hiragana and not a single trace of the actual kanji itself, you still have to know kanji to understand what is being said and it's much more complicated due to the depth of the language and a lower amount of contextual queues (Such as how the same combination of symbols can have several different meanings, just type in きそ for example and see the results that come up).

Simply put, kanji is a must to know, and you'll be all the better for it.

Austin Stewart
Austin Stewart

Become so busy I fucked up my daily schedule
Neglected anki to get some sleep instead
Finally open up anki after getting some free time
846 reviews due in 2k/6k deck, 150 in my mining deck
I'll try fitting it into my daily schedule again, but I need some motivation to get through this hell. I honestly don't even know how it could grow this high

Oliver Wilson
Oliver Wilson

But Pokemon doesn't use kanji
and some legend of zelda games do that thing where they write how the kanji sounds above the kanji

Kevin Adams
Kevin Adams

Yea don't listen to this
Learning some basic common kanji characters can help you in the long run but isn't totally necessary to actually start reading really simple stuff, but it does make things easier since it helps break up stuff since theres no space
I'd recommend learning the grammar and a few simple common verbs and before attempting to read anything, I tried to go thru a few games that either didn't use kanjis or used furigana(where above the kanji is the pronunciations in hiragana) and i spent more time looking up every other word than actually getting thru anything. Maybe a simple children's book or children's songs may help if you really want to start to practice reading the hiragana as part of complete words and sentences

Hunter Reed
Hunter Reed

unless you're 8, no.
Use a textbook and start reading when you've learned the basics from that.

Aiden Brooks
Aiden Brooks

Also to supplement the fact that children's books dont use kanji some will actually space out or group characters that are a word to make it easier for kids to know where a word starts and ends but you you'll tend not to see such things onces kanjis start to be used thus most people here recommend you to learn kanji so you can have a large scope of things you can read to practice

Kevin Reed
Kevin Reed

I started reading with childrens books and I can back up that it's a good starting point, because it's narrated exactly how English childrens books are, very straightforward and little conjugation as it's all past or present tense.

Here are 5, I haven't read off of them but I know they're all about the same level. I can post some elementary school level readers that I personally found to be a bit more useful (less mythology/culture to trip beginners up), but those are sequences of separate images so it'll be a bit more work.

Julian Russell
Julian Russell

by the way, the post reads like I'm posting the pdfs specifically for but I was more directing it towards the person who was asking for reading material

Brody Barnes
Brody Barnes

The actual motivations of individuals itt may vary significantly.
This. Aside from the obvious Japan-only game motivation, there are people who want to watch anime, be teachers, or just have access to more porn. I'm /agdg/, so I'm not going to trust localization companies to translate my game to the second most important market it will reach.
Typesetting isn't magic, it's just basic visual design. You can definitely do it yourself. Just grab a copy of Photoshop or Gimp, watch/read a tutorial, and get cracking.
insidescanlation.com/etc/How-to-edit-manga-with-Photoshop/rawr/editguide/2.html

Henry Reyes
Henry Reyes

Anki is designed to review every single day. That's why your daily reviews shouldn't be too long (<1 hour), to accommodate days like that.

Oliver Davis
Oliver Davis

Bump with a little linguistic insight.
If you've started learning the past tense you may have noticed that it is used at different times than the English past tense.
This is because it is actually a perfective tense. To be perfect, in linguistic terms, means to be complete, finished, over. Because something has to have happened in the past to be over, there is a lot of overlap.
Past tenses are different because they only care about whether you're talking about how things were in the past or not.

This is why in English we say "I went to Tokyo. It was beautiful." (Because they're both descriptions of how things were in the past), but in Japanese you say 「東京こ行きました。きれいです。」(as opposed to きれいじゃなかったです, because the act of going to Tokyo is over, perfect, but tokyo's act of being beautiful is not perfect)

Julian Johnson
Julian Johnson

That example is wrong. You would indeed say 綺麗でした in that situation. Here's a better example of what you're trying to show. In English, when a bus comes, one might say "The bus is here." But in Japanese, one would say バスが来た, even though the action occurred in the present.

But situationally, there are cases where English and Japanese both work more or less the same way, and cases where they work differently. For example, if your friend asks you for his game back, and you are looking for it because you don't know where you put it, in English, as soon as you find it, you might say "I found it."but not "I find it", despite the action just having been completed in the present. In Japanese, similarly you would say "見つけたぞ" rather than "見つけるぞ”.

Aaron Roberts
Aaron Roberts

バンプ~

Dylan Nguyen
Dylan Nguyen

Slow thread, seems to have developed into a trend over the past few months. Well, have a bump. You can learn Japanese. Don't give up.

Wyatt Rivera
Wyatt Rivera

I'm always here, I just don't have much to talk about, since I'm still in the start-up grind before actually reading much on your own is possible. Even these babby books are too complex for me to read without lots of googling: Don't give up.
Never.

Alexander Lee
Alexander Lee

As long as you can read them, even with lots of googling, it's good to occasionally do so, you'll be better prepared to start reading things once you have more grammar and vocab mastered, as actually making sense of things is a skill that's independent from grammar and vocab.

Connor Evans
Connor Evans

How do japanese separate concepts that would equal to "I like you" to "I love you"? Even though both concepts are similar, one is more important than the other. I know 3 words related to the subject: 「好き」 that should equal to like something or someone, used more lightly, 「大好き」 which would equal to really like something or someone, I assume, and 「愛してる」 that should equal to "I love you". Am I wrong here? Asking for a friend
I've haven't come back in a while since I'm busy with the grinding, other boards, my own game, among other things.

Jackson Young
Jackson Young

You're not wrong.
Asking for a friend
You should really get the fuck out though.

Dylan Hernandez
Dylan Hernandez

They seem to use 好き to mean love as well.

Hudson Hill
Hudson Hill

I saw a video where a native said that 愛する was very strong and probably wouldn't be used in real life unless it was some extreme circumstance. 大好き would then be the more general "I love you" for romantic situations. I can't say this is an absolute fact, but something to consider.

Samuel Edwards
Samuel Edwards

I thought about skipping that one so I didn't trigger autism. But it is too late now, isn't it?

Connor Martin
Connor Martin

Its used in the same way that American children use it. "I like you Susie!" "I really like you Susie!"”スーヂ好き。スーヂ大好き!”
You don't 好き your country you 愛してる your country. Same thing go to your wife. Its the same concept that English uses when it comes to like/love.

Hudson Diaz
Hudson Diaz

what game is that? Quality realism in the 2nd and 3rd pics

Owen Martin
Owen Martin

To Heart 2: Dungeon Travellers

Jace Davis
Jace Davis

I'm going to start tackling Kanji soon. Any tips on how to get this shit down? I read in tae kims guide that you should know the vocabulary before learning a certain kanji because it helps cement the kanji in your mind.

Also, do I need some kind of special kanji sheet to help my balance? I don't have one and I have no printer. Should I just start writing it out on paper without worrying so much about the balance?

Jackson Parker
Jackson Parker

Anyone have any Japanese music from the 60's and prior?

Nathan Wright
Nathan Wright

Yeah this should get you started

forum.jphip.com/index.php?topic=17255.320

I got a bunch from some of links on here. Unfortunately they don't have some of the good stuff that I collected on record but still it's a start if you look through the thread there are a bunch of good downloads. Male Singers Natsukashi no Original Hit is a great one actually, one of my favorite compilations.

Joshua Rivera
Joshua Rivera

I wouldn't say you need to learn a word containing the kanji before learning it, you could learn both at the same time just fine and then there's cases where the kanji is used often by itself as a word for a two-in-one deal. If by balance you mean the proportion of different parts of kanji when writing, then no that's not necessary although you may find it helpful in making your handwriting look better if that's something you care about. You could just pick up some graph paper somewhere and use that.

For tips: Learn the radicals. Read as much as you can. Keep in mind that there can be differences between handwritten characters and computer fonts. I can't give much advice about learning to write by hand from memory well, but if you're just aiming for recognition I wouldn't bother writing single characters out a bunch of times all at once. I wouldn't do so even if I were aiming to learn to handwriting, instead I'd guess that writing different full sentences would be a better practice.

Henry Jones
Henry Jones

Don't try to learn all 2000 kanji independently of vocab, that increases your workload so much it's nearly impossible to do. Learn some readings and the meanings of the first 300-500 most common kanji, and just learn the rest through studying vocab from there.

Camden Jenkins
Camden Jenkins

Would you recommend I use anki to help learn kanji? I am using genki 1 book to learn kanji currently. I am currently trying to write out different sentences using kanji which helps a bit.

Carson Parker
Carson Parker

Use Anki
Yeah. Use Kodansha's Kanji Learner's Course deck, there's a link to it in the OP. Also learn radicals, they will help you distinguish the differences between Kanji of similar appearance. Stroke order is also important if you want to learn how to write, so go to KanjiVG for those stroke order diagrams. Learning to write can also help you identify Kanji.

Jonathan Butler
Jonathan Butler

Don't study kanji specifically. Learn vocabulary, and memorize the written form and its pronounciation at the same time. Do this for every word you learn, no exceptions.

Julian Phillips
Julian Phillips

Learn some readings and the meanings of the first 300-500 most common kanji,
That's really encouraging. I've got around 100-150 kanji already, but was actually kinda bummed that I'm not making faster progress on vocab instead, so I can't wait to hit that mark and reallocate my kanji time to it.
Excellent ID.

Dominic James
Dominic James

Knowing kanji without vocabulary is absolutely worthless. Many kanji don't even really have a fixed meaning.

John Howard
John Howard

You know what I hate? Trying to tell the difference from 「遠」 and 「違」 since they are fucking similar. Most kanji with that damn road radical are fucking hard to tell apart.
Kodansha's Kanji Learner's Course deck
Is that any better than core 2k/6k?
It does help knowing the general meaning of a kanji, though, even though it's meaning could vary, you know more or less what the compound would be about if you do know what the kanji means, but you can do that directly from vocabs.

Asher Wilson
Asher Wilson

yeah, since a lot of the more common kanji stand alone as words, when you learn the more common ones you're getting vocab practice done, but after a point it's just plain dumb to try and memorize all 2000 kanji without having a large vocabulary made up of words using those kanji.

Jaxson Peterson
Jaxson Peterson

Core2k/6k focuses on vocabulary. When you study it, you will learn words. Because words contain Kanji, you will also absorb pertinent information about Kanji, such as their different readings. Kodansha's Kanji Learner's Course is a deck that focuses only on Kanji. You will learn all their readings and nothing more, although each card includes a small sampling of words that contain that Kanji. If you want to study Kanji on their own, then you can study Kodansha + radicals.

It's better to just do vocabulary with Core2k/6k because you will learn to recognize Kanji within the context of actual words. As an example, Core2k/6k will show you 「木」 and tell you that it means "tree" and that it's pronounced 「き」. Then it will show you 「木曜日」 and tell you that it means "Thursday" and that it's pronounced 「もくようび」. If you're perceptive, you will see that the word for Thursday also uses the Kanji for tree, and you will notice that they're read differently (i.e. you learn through observation that both 「き」 and 「もく」 are valid ways to read that Kanji, and that different words will use different readings).

Kodansha's deck just shows you the Kanji, without words, and expects you to memorize every reading that it gives you. As you know, Kanji have Onyomi and Kunyomi readings, and a single Kanji can have numerous readings for both. So, it will show you 「木」 and you have to list off all the potential readings. If you ask me, this is a waste of time, but you asked for a way to learn Kanji, so here it is.

If this still doesn't make sense to you, then allow me to use a programming analogy. In programming languages, the programmer must tell the compiler how to recognize different data types. There are a few different data types, and you can even specify your own unique data types through building namespaces and constructs. No matter what, though, there is always a syntax for declaring a variable with a given data type, and it's pretty much this:

data_type variable_Name;

Where the [data_type] is a keyword that specifies what data type you're using, and the [variable_Name] is the name of the variable you're declaring that will hold said data type. For example, if you want to declare a variable that is meant to contain a whole number, you can declare an integer
here the integer variables are declared
int myNumber = 8;
int myOtherNumber = 4;
int difference;
notice that [difference] is a variable with not value; it's because variables are merely containers that hold data. When you initialize it, you don't necessarily have to give it a value
you might want to have a function/algorithm/whatever fill the variable with data
difference = myNumber - myOtherNumber;
In this case, the compiler would know to do the math and the [difference] variable's value would be set to [4]

How the fuck is this relevant to Japanese? Well, just think of Kanji as variables. Variables are just containers that hold certain types of data. Every Kanji is a container that holds a number of values that represent patterns of pronunciation. Say we have an imaginary Kanji data type, and we want to use it to give declared Kanji their readings. It would look something like this:

Kanji 「木」 = [き、 もく]
example words: I've given you these above
Kanji 「水」 = [すい、 みず]
example words: 水泳、 水
Kanji [日] = [にち、 じつ、 ひ]
example words:日曜日、 祝日、 日
And so on and so forth. When you learn to read vocabulary words, you will also learn to gleam the different readings for words that use the same Kanji. There are numerous examples, I have already given you a few there. The point is, you don't need to waste time learning the readings for each Kanji, you just need to learn words that use those Kanji. However, if you're shit at visual recognition, then it may benefit you to study radicals and learn to notice the minute details between Kanji, because there are more than a few of them that look quite similar.

Lincoln Morris
Lincoln Morris

You know what I hate? Trying to tell the difference from 「遠」 and 「違」 since they are fucking similar. Most kanji with that damn road radical are fucking hard to tell apart.
Learn kanji then. Those are completely different.

I don't really understand why people say it is a waste of time. It helps so much with recognizing the difference between kanji rather than just trying to learn the symbols through vocab.

Alexander Price
Alexander Price

Kodansha's deck just shows you the Kanji, without words, and expects you to memorize every reading that it gives you
This is exactly my problem with just studying kanji, that's really impractical. I'd say learning to identify radicals in some cases is more important than studying kanji on itself to tell apart kanji that looks the similar.
Read above. You can learn to recognize the difference between kanji while learning vocab, as the user above pointed out. I rarely need to look for individual kanji, and I usually do to get a better grasp of their meaning or what radicals it contains, but not the pronunciation, there are pronunciations that are barely used anyway, so, again, it's a waste of time in that regard.

Brayden Miller
Brayden Miller

You obviously don't learn pronunciations when learning kanji. You learn the meaning and how to write them.

Kayden Cruz
Kayden Cruz

You can learn the meaning as you learn vocab. As I said, I usually look for the meaning when I want a better grasp of it or it's too ambiguous. As for writing, not too keen on that.

Mason Wood
Mason Wood

There's nothing wrong with studying kanji. What people will usually tell you not to do is learn kanji in isolation; absent of vocabulary, because learning them together allows your mind to make connections between them, saving you study time by allowing you to learn more efficiently and as said kanji are mostly worthless without vocabulary. Some people can get by just learning vocabulary but different people of course have different methods that work for them. For those who struggle to recognize and differentiate kanji instinctively through vocabulary, it can be perfectly sensible to go out their way to fill that gap by studying the kanji. Learning radicals, writing kanji out, getting a basic idea of it's meaning or assigning keywords to be used as mnemonics for vocabulary or whatever else helps I guess. Writing practice has helped me a lot with differentiating similar looking characters personally.

Wyatt Martinez
Wyatt Martinez

Knowing the meaning of the kanji helps you learn vocab though. For example, I instantly knew what 捕鯨 meant the first time I saw it, since I knew the meaning of those kanji.

Committing around 2000 kanji meanings to memory is less work than committing 10000+ vocab meanings to memory.

Matthew Green
Matthew Green

Good taste OP

Jackson Hughes
Jackson Hughes

user those two look completely different, what are you talking about? that's a really bad example.

Elijah Campbell
Elijah Campbell

But in most cases, individual kanji don't have a single precise meaning. Kanji are heavily overloaded with various meanings, and you automatically learn these meanings in the context of their actual usage when you learn vocabulary along with its proper written form. It isn't an either / or situation. You should learn kanji along with vocab at exactly the same time, not study kanji alone or vocab alone.

For example, what is the point of individually memorizing a character like 調 without learning any vocabulary associated with it.
According to the dictionary, it has the following "basic meanings":
tune
tone
meter
key (music)
writing style
prepare
exorcise
investigate

Why would you want to waste your time learning all that, which is in fact just an agglomeration of some of the disparate meanings of various compounds, instead of actually learning the compounds themselves and their individual meanings?

Learning 調 only by itself won't automatically mean you somehow "know" all the words written with it, which vary like this, to give you a small sample:
調べる investigate 体調 physical condition
口調 tone 順調 favorable 調達 supply. 強調 emphasis 調理 cooking

By only "knowing" kanji like 調 individually and out of context without knowing any of the associated vocabulary words that actually use it, you're not really teaching yourself anything particularly useful. Here's a counter example to 捕鯨. 調理 is 調 "tune /tone/ meter / key (music) /writing style / prepare /exorcise / investigate" + 理 "logic / arrangement / reason / truth / justice ", but the word actually means "cooking". You would never be able to deduce that meaning just from "knowing" the kanji. Do you see how worthless it is to learn kanji independent of vocabulary when in fact many, many compounds are pretty arbitrary like this example.

I'm not saying you should memorize every possible word that can be written with a given kanji every time you learn a kanji as some of those words are not that common, but you should definitely at least learn several of the most common words or you're doing yourself a great disservice and you'll probably end in failure. Being able to brag that you "know" 2000 kanji despite knowing very little of the actual language you're trying to study smacks of autism and would be a pretty sad joke in the end.

Ayden Smith
Ayden Smith

I'm not saying you should only learn one or the other. But most people seem to only learn vocab, and I think that is a mistake.

Jordan Richardson
Jordan Richardson

"woman-under-roof-ADJ" means "inexpensive" (安い)
Seems like the exact opposite of what it should be tbh.

Carter Rodriguez
Carter Rodriguez

Even you
Don't study kanji specifically.

Brody James
Brody James

especially when there are kanji like 土 and 士 that look very similar even when put right next to each other.

Joseph Brooks
Joseph Brooks

Is English your second language. Do you even understand what "specifically" means? And do you understand the context of that response? That user is asking if he should study kanji characters by themselves instead of studying actual vocabulary written out with kanji, which no, he shouldn't do.

Camden Myers
Camden Myers

Without replying to anyone specifically, I'll just say on the vocab/kanji debate, that I have found the most success personally by studying vocab in 50-70 word sets, picking 10-15 of the most common kanji that appear in that set out and studying them in conjunction with that set, and adding the kanji of any words that are giving me a lot of trouble.
btw, genki does everything except the last part for you for chapters 4+, but only if you remember to use the reading section in the back of the book
And when you study those kanji, I recommend focusing on the meaning and the radicals over the readings. Search for the character on Wiktionary to find a decomposition into radicals with their meaning (check the 'translingual' and 'chinese' sections).

Blake Diaz
Blake Diaz

Oh fuck you, I'm not getting into a semantics fight.

check the 'translingual' and 'chinese' sections
Do note that Chinese characters are often different than the corresponding kanji.

Parker Morales
Parker Morales

you search by the symbol and then check the 'Chinese' section because it gives etymology information. I should specify that you only care about the 'Glyph Origin' subsection.

Carson Reed
Carson Reed

As long as you're not learning Chinese by accident. I just used the Remembering the Kanji book.

Easton Garcia
Easton Garcia

FUGG YOU
Nice way of saying "I got BTFO."
How about these:
日曰
夭天
That would be a catastrophic failure. Chinese meanings are wildly different a lot of the time. 這 means "crawl" in Japanese, but "this" in Chinese. 是 means "this" in Japanese, but "is" in Chinese.

William Wood
William Wood

also the entire word 大丈夫

Eli Diaz
Eli Diaz

I'm doing genki kanji practice and I'm confused on numbers

七十一万四千円

would this be 7010400 yen?

Grayson Flores
Grayson Flores

hmm i meant 7014000 yen

Christian Powell
Christian Powell

No, 714,000. 十万 is 100,000

Nathan Torres
Nathan Torres

Have some practice.

Wyatt Adams
Wyatt Adams

Why is she this cute?

Joseph Gray
Joseph Gray

because she's インテリジェンススーパーAI

Noah Murphy
Noah Murphy

Why is 'ha' sometimes pronounced 'wa'? Does it only ever apply to the hiragana, or does it happen with ha's katakana as well?

Ryder Martin
Ryder Martin

Read up on は as a particle, it's more than just "sometimes" and knowing about it is essential to understanding even the most basic japanese sentences.
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/particlesintro

Carter Nguyen
Carter Nguyen

This is why Genki sucks. it's very very rare for people to use numbered kanji, outside of 百 千 万 億, when counting money.

The old JLPT textbooks used to have the best method for learning Kanji - everything is ordered by leading pronunciation and is provided in the context of a sentence in both kana and kanji. On top of that the Vocabulary book as well was good in that it grouped related words into a common theme (family, friends, work, hobby, medicine, cars, etc.)

Camden Watson
Camden Watson

Thanks. I'm learning the ropes.

Kevin Myers
Kevin Myers

historically, kanji had many such irregular usages, but most of them were reformed to match a regular pattern, the exceptions being in particles where the irregular usage was more common than the regular one, such as in は and へ, which are usually 'ha' and 'he', but as particles are 'wa' and 'e'.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historical_kana_orthography

Juan Morris
Juan Morris

kana* had many irregular usages. And keep in mind that you only need to look out for those irregular spellings in particles and phrases that include particles (like こんにちは, which is literally 'this-day-TOPIC…')

Joseph Garcia
Joseph Garcia

i keep seeing being told that ~が、~ translates to '…, but…', but it seems to me based on how I've seen it used that a better translation is '…; …', because it seems like が、 can act as any coördinating conjunction, the same way that ';' can stand in for any coördinating conjunction. Am I wrong?

Isaiah James
Isaiah James

が has a few different uses as a particle, one of them is connecting two pieces of conflicting information the same way the word "but" does, but oftentimes it means something else entirely.

Easton Parker
Easton Parker

Yes, as a clause ending particle it seems to be able con connect conflicting independent clauses or nonconflicting independent clauses, the same way ';' can in English, so ';' is a better translation of 'が、' than ', but', right?

Jack Sullivan
Jack Sullivan

you can't translate particles, stop trying now and read tae kim before you proceed further.

Nicholas Gray
Nicholas Gray

fuck off. If you can only dodge the question or argue semantics then just don't reply to the questions. You can absolutely translate particles often, like you already did implicitly, but when you can't you can gloss them, which is obviously included under what I'm trying to discuss.

Samuel Johnson
Samuel Johnson

That's a really common word, though, you must be a retard to get confused by it, and it looks pretty good too, like 「未来」

Robert Jackson
Robert Jackson

Seems to be a lot of division on how to learn kanji. I am tackling it now and I'm struggling to find the best strategy to learn kanji. Would the CORE anki deck be useful in this? I'm using it right now but I don't really like it. It's teaching me stuff that I don't really have context on yet.

How did you guys learn kanji? Did you have a set strategy or did you just learn vocabulary words and memorized the kanji associated with it?

Ryan Jackson
Ryan Jackson

I started off just using a core 2K deck for vocab. After 4-5 months I started going through a Kanji book that covers the most recent 常用 kanji and their history. I think there is value in both singular kanji study and vocab, but vocab is more immediately useful and you have to learn that anyway, so if you want to only focus on one thing then that is it.

It's teaching me stuff that I don't really have context on yet.
This is going to happen a lot so I wouldn't stress about it too much. Once you start taking in a lot of native material you will be seeing the words you learn frequently which will help them make more sense and stick with you better.

I also write out by hand every single word/kanji I learn a few times and make mnemonics if necessary. This helps me remember them better. You will likely need to experiment for a bit until you find what works best for you.

Jordan Russell
Jordan Russell

a lot of people have already posted their recommendations on the subject earlier itt.
is mine
there are generally 3 schools of thought about it:
don't study kanji alone, only vocab (written in its most common form, which will usually be kanji)
study vocab, pick out kanji from your vocab based on which ones are common and which ones appear in words that you are having trouble with
go hard in the kanji decks, and don't even start looking at vocab until you can knock out a 2k kanji deck without blinking.
Personally, the third seems impractical to me, and also not very useful. The first is what I used to think, the idea being that learning kanji specifically is like an someone learning English studying latin and greek roots, as in you will learn their meaning as you go anyway and the vocab is the only thing that is directly useful.
Now, I prefer the second method, not because I think learning kanji specifically is very useful in and of itself, but because learning kanji makes learning vocab easier.

Juan Cox
Juan Cox

Most people end up doing some version of >>13742574's option 2, but how much kanji you deign to learn individually is up to you, you'll get a feel for it as you learn more, but realize that you don't need to learn all 2000 kanji individually

Xavier Cox
Xavier Cox

The core deck is just vocab. If you want to learn kanji, I recommend the book Remembering the Kanji. Either buy it or find a pdf somewhere.

I did the third one. Kanji was one of the first things I learned after kana. I don't think it was a waste of time either.

Ultimately each person has a method that will work for them, there is no one perfect method.

Michael Anderson
Michael Anderson

There's also the related debate over whether to learn radicals, which is basically divided into 3 corresponding sides, but they don't generally correspond in terms of supporters.
don't study radicals, only kanji, because the relationship between radicals and kanji meanings is more eradic than the relationship between kanji meanings and vocab meanings, and doesn't tell you anything about how to pronounce words.
break your kanji into radicals as you study and note their meanings, learning the common ones as you go and going out of your way to study them only when it will help you memorize a kanji or vocab
before studying kanji, learn the radicals. The idea being that if learning 2000 kanji makes learning 20000 vocab words easier, then learning 214 radicals will make learning 2000 kanji easier
personally, I, again used to go with the first option, but switched to the second because I found it helped my learn vocab more effectively
However, I don't think the third option in this debate is impractical like the third option in the kanji debate is. In fact, I would say that if you are going to learn kanji first because it makes learning vocab earlier, there is basically no reason not to learn the radicals first.

Ryan Hill
Ryan Hill

Studying kanji and studying radicals is the same thing anyway. Radicals are just basic kanji, like 火、水、人、木、etc.

Austin Long
Austin Long

Suppose I want to say 'There is a test in Japanese class tomorrow'
is the most appropriate sentance:
明日、日本のクラスにはテストがあります
or something more like
明日、テストは日本語のクラスでります

Writing anything sensible is much harder than reading.

Dominic Ramirez
Dominic Ramirez

明日、 クラスで日本語のテストがあります
I think this sounds more right.

Christopher Lopez
Christopher Lopez

Something like 「明日に日本語のテストがある」 seems to work better imo.

Landon Wood
Landon Wood

I'm currently seeing great results using a combination of Core2k for vocab and KanjiDamage Reordered, which prioritizes the most-used kanji, and radicals. Learning radicals has been very helpful because I apparently do extremely well with mnemonic-based learning, and they make that even easier. I couldn't retain shit prior to this method, so I would definitely recommend it to anyone with a similar learning style, or anyone who hasn't found a method that works for them yet.

Jace Thompson
Jace Thompson

That's a neat WebM of Lain, I wonder if that program could render text at smaller font. Some scenes were very fluid and Lain really sticks out.

Justin Diaz
Justin Diaz

Yea that is strangely cute.. but what is sad is there was a comment that there's a discord group attempting to sub this video. Seriously?

Ryan Ortiz
Ryan Ortiz

How many of you have taken a class for Japanese? I'm assuming most of you are just teaching yourselves

Easton Taylor
Easton Taylor

I'm teaching myself. A classroom setting isn't necessarily going to guarantee that you will become fluent in the language. It has its positives, though. For one, you will likely be instructed by someone who is fluent in the language, whom you can ask for guidance and advice, and there are numerous people who are just starting out along with you, so you can find someone to study with. There's also the simple fact that a classroom setting will impose upon you obligations in the form of due dates for papers and other tasks, which can be beneficial to people who don't have the motivation to keep themselves studying.

I don't have the money to go to college or hire a private instructor, and even if I did, my local universities don't offer a Japanese course, so I'm on my own if I want to learn this language. For me, it's fine, though, because it gives me something to do, I'm genuinely interested in the material, and there is an abundance of Japanese media and learning resources online.

Nicholas Johnson
Nicholas Johnson

Yeah, I share your sentiments. I do have a good friend who is learning with me, so I'm grateful for that.

Aiden Parker
Aiden Parker

She explicitly asks for translators because having subs gives her a wider audience so she can get more sun-shekels 円

Nicholas Johnson
Nicholas Johnson

In conversation you'd probably drop the に and の.

Aaron Roberts
Aaron Roberts

A class would probably be useful for speaking and writing, since you have someone to correct you. It's not necessary just for reading and listening though.

Leo Hall
Leo Hall

I'm taking one currently. It's useful in some ways and will teach you the basics. However, I think if you motivate yourself you can probably get more done.

I'm not sure if I should take another semester of it honestly. It's something I have to decide soon. It's helped me but at the same time I want to be able to teach myself and not rely on completing assignments.

Gavin Hughes
Gavin Hughes

What are some easy J-Dramas to understand that also have japanese subtitles available? I've watched ちゃんぽん食べたか and ブランケットキャッツ, which are on nyaa and have subtitles available on other sites.

Henry Morgan
Henry Morgan

ちんぽ食べた
な…なに!?

Asher Ramirez
Asher Ramirez

違うよ!

Elijah Evans
Elijah Evans

何が違う、このちんぽ好き

Henry Williams
Henry Williams

ちんぽ好きじゃない
あの、ちょっと

Nicholas Sanchez
Nicholas Sanchez

Can anyone explain why the second answers for 2, 3, and 4 are all が as opposed to か?

guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/adjectives_ex

よろしくお願いします

Daniel Young
Daniel Young

To put it at its most simple, が is basically a subject marker. If there's a single sentence (and it's not a negative sentence) then you're probably going to want to mark the subject off with が. You can't really use か in that manner.

Think of が like a more specific は. は kind of sets up the topic of a conversation, and が sets up the subject of the sentence. You won't see か doing that kind of thing. Does that help?

Jason Cox
Jason Cox

oh whoops, my bad. I meant to ask "why is it が and not は" Not sure why my brain said か there.

For #2 it makes sense, since they're establishing games as the thing that is fun.

I'm not so solid on #3 and #4 though.

For #3, is が used to establish that Jim is the important person? Why couldn't は be used for that purpose? Or would は be implying that Jim was always the important person?

For #4, isn't the subject already defined by the first sentence? Why wouldn't は be correct there?

Joshua Young
Joshua Young

Does the difficulty with memorizing the complex patterns of japanese writing ever go away?
I might hold something for a few days but then they're completely new to me once I see them the next time.

Nicholas Morris
Nicholas Morris

the complex patterns of japanese writing
Are you referring to the Kana, or to Kanji? I find mnemonic devices work best for both.
I might hold something for a few days but then they're completely new to me
What method are you doing to memorize them? If you're using Anki already, but are still having that problem, 99% chance you're simply doing too many new cards per day.

Robert Nguyen
Robert Nguyen

For #3, Alice is asking a general question, something like, "Who is an important person?" Bob answers with a specific: "Jim is important." Because he's talking about a specific person as opposed to a generic, and he's not attempting to steer the conversation to his specific example, he uses が.

To put it another way, Alice's topic is important people. Not a specific important person, but important people in general. "Who is important," with the understanding that the concept of "important people" is the topic, not the specific who. Bob's single sentence is about a specific important person. The topic at hand is still "important people," but Bob mentions a specific important person, so his sentence uses が. If he were to use は the sentence would be entirely grammatically correct, but the implication would be that Bob wants the discussion to be entirely about Jim now, and not "important people."

The situation in the 4th example is kind of similar. Alice brings up spicy foods as a conversation and asks if Bob likes them. Bob mentions no, he instead likes non-spicy food, but leaves the topic open, probably so he can then talk about what specifically he dislikes concerning spicy foods, or spicy foods he likes that are an exception to his "only non-spicy food" preferences. Even for Japanese that sentence seems a little awkward, though. Normally I think you'd just say, "好きじゃない。"

I mean, that's basically how it was taught to me. You mark a conversational topic with は so everyone knows what the overall discussion is supposed to be about. You mention specific examples, direct objects, or sentence subjects with が so everyone knows what this one specific sentence is about. I don't really think there's an English equivalent, and I suppose I could be entirely wrong. It wouldn't be the first time I was taught incorrectly (I was also taught that だ was just an informal version of です and nothing more).

Camden Phillips
Camden Phillips

が is the particle you want in answer sentences like that. ジムが大切だ。 You're emphasizing that Jim is the answer to the question that was just asked.

Yes, if you study correctly you'll be able to spot the differences between radicals in kanji. It's hard at first, but when you get into the mindset of breaking down the kanji into simpler parts it'll be a lot easier differentiating and writing kanji. If you mean kana, then which ones are you having trouble with? Using mnemonics is also helpful for both kana/radicals/kanji,

Justin Hughes
Justin Hughes

Aside from just establishing a subject, が also places emphasis on what comes before it. Likewise, はplaces emphasis on what comes after. So for #3:
大切な人は誰?
ジムが大切だ。
About important person(s), WHO?
JIM is the one who is important.

Evan Adams
Evan Adams

I can't not ask someone to tell me what it says.

Nathan Johnson
Nathan Johnson

After 3 Weeks of light review and practice I have memorised all of the Hiragana and will be starting Katakana soon, For those who are still trying or want to start, you can do it, if I can then anyone can.

Carter Diaz
Carter Diaz

Boy, you're getting started. Knowing kana on itself is a huge step forward and a good tool for the future, but that's not even 1% of the job done. But keep going, user, you can do it.

Jonathan Davis
Jonathan Davis

Is there a way to make failed anki cards only appear once all other cards have been cleared?

I prefer to do them solo but constantly needing to hit wrong so I can work on them at the end is a pain

Nicholas Miller
Nicholas Miller

You shouldn't. When you're keeping all the difficult cards at the end, the diminished number of cards will make you keep their meaning in short term memory and you'll eventually forget.

seconding… I'm curious what the futa's testes are for.

Kayden Morales
Kayden Morales

雌雄逆転についてまったくまとまらない頭のなかの垂れ流し
Regarding the sudden change between sexes, it's not entirely resolved by tip's discharge


It's a mystery

外見上は女性器に近い?
精液は出る
Does the outward appearance seem similar to female genitalia?
The genitalia produces semen

雌堕ちへの強い意志
The strong-willed female's droppings

とげみたいな突起が生えてるっよそう
(Someone, perhaps the girl or her partner,) wants to remove the protruding bumps that are growing (on her genitals).

潤滑用の体液
精液は出ない
Uses bodily fluids as lubrication. The genitalia doesn't produce semen.

Hunter Baker
Hunter Baker

Thanks.
Nice spoilers though, faggot.

Kevin Reyes
Kevin Reyes

Doing good user. I finished studying hiragana a while ago. I'm making steps towards doing this. Kanji is quite difficult though.

Angel Lewis
Angel Lewis

ありがとうございます

That makes a lot more sense now and definitely explains why が was the right choice. Thanks for all your responses.

Blake Gutierrez
Blake Gutierrez

アヲが禁止

Daniel Hughes
Daniel Hughes

アッ、アッ、アウウウウがいい?

Jason James
Jason James

それから「オヲ」です

David Hughes
David Hughes

Second file is broken

Christian Taylor
Christian Taylor

that means you have a bad video player
It's part of the new video/* ≫ image/* encoding. It should be VP9. Switching to AV1 as soon as beta
e.g. vs file_store

Leo Rodriguez
Leo Rodriguez

Is there a thread to learn whatever language you just spoke?

Leo Sanchez
Leo Sanchez

How good are you with the command line?
If you answered no, sorry I can't.

Christian Garcia
Christian Garcia

use codecs that aren't supported by browsers
get mad at person for having a browser that doesn't support codec

Lincoln Parker
Lincoln Parker

What are some good videogames that are not too difficult to read but aren't babby-tier shit?

Asher James
Asher James

Just start with your favorite RPG from the PS1/PS2 era. Something with textboxes, so you can look up any words you don't know.

Samuel Evans
Samuel Evans

um what

Leo Edwards
Leo Edwards

雌雄逆転, as you can see in the picture I attached that is from a scientific article about an insect species where the female has a penis-like organ and mounts the male, refers to the reversal of the roles played by males and females during copulation. まったく when used before an adjective strengthens the meaning like saying "totally / utterly / completely" in English.
For example, まったくばかばかしい, means something like "utterly ridiculous", or "totally absurd". Something that's まとまっている is neatly in order, thus まとまらない means something like "disordered, disorganized, incoherent". 頭のなか thus must be referring to the author's own head, not the tip of the genitalia.
垂れ流し is being used figuratively, but it normally refers to vile things like urine and waste.
So 頭のなかの垂れ流し is referring to some nasty stuff that came out of the author's head.

I think it should be translated as something like this:
雌雄逆転についてまったくまとまらない頭のなかの垂れ流し
”Totally incoherent garbage concerning male-female sexual role reversal that I came up with."

雌堕ち means roughly "falling as a female".
It's used in the context of feminization with regard to turning a male into a bitch/ sissy by fucking them. When へ is used in noun phrases instead of modifying a verb, it's always followed by の. For example, 聖者への道 means "the path to sainthood". Thus a more correct translation is something like this:
雌堕ちへの強い意志
"A strong will to make guys her bitch."

とげみたいな突起が生えてる
Spine-like protuberances are growing.
つよそう
Looks strong. (this is つよ as in つよい+そう)

David Lopez
David Lopez

j'aime la
bite?

Landon Flores
Landon Flores

ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/産卵管
English

Ryan Kelly
Ryan Kelly

saving images as video
For what purpose, it'd make wanting to image edit a pain

Easton Cruz
Easton Cruz

Compression,bandwidth,fidelity,capabilities, [insert parameters]
Fuck, you can 3D format video than image

Jayden Long
Jayden Long

This video really helps learn Nipspeak (if you're initiated in baneposting and know the entire scene word by word).

Ian Wright
Ian Wright

A: 釣りつまらない。帰りたい。

B: つべこべなければ, 釣り餌として使う.

A: 兄ちゃんの酷い!

I made this dialogue myself. Someone tell me if it's grammatically correct or at least coherent.

Ethan Rogers
Ethan Rogers

anybody tried watching anime with the new google translating earbuds yet

I'm sure it's a wonderful experience in quality Artificial Intelligence at work.

Thomas Morales
Thomas Morales

I don't imagine it's possible to translate real time until they finish their sentences, much less so with a context sensitive language.

Nathan Peterson
Nathan Peterson

Is that even a thing? Google translate barely works, so something with only voice input without the context from kanji probably would be even worse.

Ayden Gomez
Ayden Gomez

I doubt it. Maybe for Latin-based or Germanic languages. I've never had Google Translate be useful for anything Japanese but translating specific words, and finding Kanji. A leap that far in translation technology is unlikely at best.

Nathan White
Nathan White

Is it worth it to work with a language exchange/pen pal? Am I just going to find old cat ladies?

Matthew Mitchell
Matthew Mitchell

Only if both of you have some basic understanding, or at least one of you has a low-intermediate level where they can understand the other's advice in the original language.
I get annoyed and tired of people kinda quick and can bee lazy to write up replies, but that's a personality problem on my end. Both of you should need to maintain interest and fair contact.
I haven't tried it so take this with salt

Evan Mitchell
Evan Mitchell

Making a Japanese friend instead would be more efficient for you since you won't be obligated to swap between languages.

I can understand what you're saying, but there are errors. For A: you probably want to add a は or が after 釣り, though just つまらない alone is fine between the two when it's already understood they'll be fishing. For B: なければ is wrong, you want 言えば or something similar. なければ is used like so 光がなければ見れない or is how negative ば form ends with other verbs (走らなければ間に合わない). For C: you can't use an i-adjective there. I think it can only be a na-adjective in this case where it's like your calling someone something negative like that but I haven't really thought about it too much. So either お兄ちゃん酷い or like 酷いよお兄ちゃん or お兄ちゃんのバカ or something. For other uses of の where you are describing possession, location, an attribute or whatever, you still can't use just an i-adjective, it must be joining two noun phrases, though you can omit the second noun phrase if its understood by context.

Henry Nelson
Henry Nelson

Does anyone here practice streaking by using Japanese to talk to the staff at Japanese restaurants?
When I learned Spanish I did this at Mexican restaurants and it helped a lot and I never had any problems.
But now with Japanese I'm more reluctant to for a couple reasons, most of which book down to not wanting to be accused of being racist.

Justin Gomez
Justin Gomez

Why would they think you are racist for learning their language?

William Diaz
William Diaz

I'm guessing not the people who actually work there and speak the language but the fucktards who think learning a second language is cultural appropriation or "assuming" people are from Japan because they work there and calling it racist.

Jordan Davis
Jordan Davis

Shut up weeboo gaijin
Yu only care about our culture for our grorius Chinese tapestries

Isaac Garcia
Isaac Garcia

Younger Asian people in Amrica especailly tend to be really big into SocJus.

Jeremiah Bailey
Jeremiah Bailey

"assuming" people are from Japan because they work there and calling it racist.
That's pretty reasonable. Spanish is a common second language in America, ha so it's likely. Japanese is too foreign and there are a lot people that like the style style despite knowing nothing about it.
There's a small sushi shop near me that looks more Chinese than Jap. I don't go there often enough to tell though.

Ian Murphy
Ian Murphy

It's pretty rare for 'Japanese' restaurants in the US to be run by nips and not gooks or chinks.

Aiden Moore
Aiden Moore

This is a big part of it. There's one restaurant in particular that my family ways at when we visit other family, and the menus are in Japanese, they serve Korean barbeque and sushi, and all the decor is Chinese (or at the very least written in man'yogana) and I can't tell which ethnicity the owners or employees are by looking at them or hearing their accent.

Isaiah Watson
Isaiah Watson

I can't tell which ethnicity the owners or employees are by looking at them or hearing their accent.
Chinese, Japanese, and Korean all sound pretty different though.

Ayden James
Ayden James

This, if you can't at least tell the difference between Japanese and Chinese (I personally think Korean is a bit harder, I usually tell by being able to understand Japanese and not Korean), you won't benefit any from talking to the employees.

Daniel Howard
Daniel Howard

It's not like they're speaking in their native language around me. The only thing I have to go by are their accents which aren't actually that thick.

Hudson Adams
Hudson Adams

Oh, that can be hard to figure out then. At every asian restaurant I've been to I've heard at least a few interactions between staff in their native language. It's more common if it's authentic, there's a legit Dim Sum place around here and it's absolutely full of chinks, to the point where the waiters speak more Chinese than English. The more americanized restaurants have a lot less asians in them, so less chances to hear what language the staff speak.

Ryan Carter
Ryan Carter

Finally got to the point where I've memorized the Kana, now it's time to rev up those anki decks.

Ian Turner
Ian Turner

I just got out of the kiddie pool
time to go swim a marathon
You can't learn nihongo

Jeremiah Clark
Jeremiah Clark

Anki is more like training for the marathon.

Thomas Robinson
Thomas Robinson

I think that might be confirmation bias. There aren't that many Asians in America in total, but they have a higher than average standard of living, which means a greater proportion of Asian kids go to college, so there's a greater chance of exposure. Therefore, when seeing Asians into socjus, it also seems like a greater proportions of Asians as a whole are into it, because they're the only Asians who are deciding to stick out and screech like retards. I think they're just a vocal minority, like the rest of socjus is.
What's the marathon?

Kevin Garcia
Kevin Garcia

Thanks for the input.

Adam Davis
Adam Davis

I don't think you know what confirmation bias means; what you described is a spurious relationship.

Parker Morris
Parker Morris

You just think that because of confirmation bias.

Eli Johnson
Eli Johnson

What's the marathon?
N1 I guess. Or just living in Japan.

Eli Lee
Eli Lee

why would anyone want to live in japan

Nolan Murphy
Nolan Murphy

Anki 2k/6k deck, how to disable/remove furigana from the example sentences?

Wyatt Martinez
Wyatt Martinez

Go into Browse, then select one of the cards from the deck. You can either click the Fields… button below the list of cards and select the field containing furigana, then delete it to permanently remove that field from the deck or you can click Cards… button and remove whatever pertains to that field to make it not show up on the cards for that deck format. You might have to edit the Cards… field in addition to deleting the field from Fields… if you want to completely remove it from the deck I can't quite recall.

Gavin Cruz
Gavin Cruz

水曜日に日本人にあいます
I think this sentence is correct. It means I am going to meet a japanese person on wednesday. I met her through the HelloTalk app. Her english seems to be very good, which is nice because I don't know much japanese yet.

I was watching videos about how I should be learning japanese. It kind of demotivated me because it made me realize how much more I have to learn. I realize that learning from a textbook doesn't really prepare you for conversations with actual japanese people.

Does anybody feel the same way?

I'm also taking a japanese class to help learn japanese, however I think learning in a class might not be the most effective way to learn a language.

Leo Smith
Leo Smith

A good class should be having you do listening activities with samples from native speakers and conversational speaking activities.
It's not the quite the same as talking to a native speaker yourself but the adjustment is a lot smaller and it's going to get you to the best starting point possible.
If your listening comprehension is good and you can produce quickly enough for use in a conversation that's got you most of the way there.

Isaiah Moore
Isaiah Moore

A good class would be pretty useful, but that also depends on how you learn individually. However the chances of you actually getting a good class are fairly low, but they can help you get the basics down, especially if you have trouble self-motivating.

Nathaniel Parker
Nathaniel Parker

We do some listening activities. Mostly it's just our teacher asking us something in japanese and we have to answer back. She gives us some resources to practice some of the textbook material, which helps somewhat.
I suppose you are right, we don't have to adjust as much which is nice. Still, I think there are a lot of nuances in conversations that most people will not understand if they take a japanese class. You are right in that it is a good starting point.

That seems to be true I suppose. I've learned a lot over the past months, a few months ago I couldn't say any sentences in japanese at all and now I can say basic stuff. I guess I've come a long way.

I think I'm just a bit frustrated because I want to be able to learn more at a faster pace. But a lot of people say that learning a new language is like running a marathon, not a sprint to the finish line.

Jordan Thompson
Jordan Thompson

I think I'm just a bit frustrated because I want to be able to learn more at a faster pace. But a lot of people say that learning a new language is like running a marathon, not a sprint to the finish line.
Yeah, you don't want to rush. Slow and steady is better than burning yourself out and eventually giving up.

Noah Johnson
Noah Johnson

tbh you're not wrong. I'm an ardent defender of foreign language classes as an idea, but so many schools and businesses across all languages are actively changing their classes for the worse because people don't want to learn a language well they want to learn it leisurely.

Yeah, that isn't enough. You need to get used to listening to people who aren't changing their speech to help you, which all teachers eventually do. Ideally you have prerecorded conversations between native speakers speaking clearly but naturally.

It is entirely possible that the class is going too slow for you. That's one of the changes that a lot of institutions are making. I'd see if they have advanced classes on the same level, as in the equivalent to an AP course in high school, and if they do see if it's more your speed.

Evan Thompson
Evan Thompson

Well the genki book provides some conversations on it's cds which I use sometimes. I don't listen to them as often as I should though. Maybe that is where I am messing up.

Also, yes I suppose it could be going pretty slow. It takes about 2 semesters to get through a genki book. I am already enrolled in japanese 102, which is the second half of elementary japanese.

The japanese person that I am going to meet speaks almost perfect english on HelloTalk app. She goes to a language school in Hollywood. I'm guessing her listening skills and speaking aren't too great and that's why she want to practice talking to me.

Caleb King
Caleb King

For clarification, when I said that I am enrolled in japanese 102, it means I am taking that next semester. I am currently in Japanese 101 which is going to finish soon.

Easton Reed
Easton Reed

Can you read yet? That's where you'll do most of your learning anyway, through practical application like Japanese games and shit.

Andrew Martinez
Andrew Martinez

Not quite. I don't know enough vocabulary and I haven't really figured out how I'm going to learn kanji yet. I know very little kanji so far because I haven't practiced much of it yet.

John Gomez
John Gomez

I guess they start you out with all kana (or even worse, romaji), rather than jump right into kanji.

Julian Scott
Julian Scott

There are reading sections in the back of the Genki book. I don't know if you're using them but they're a good resource to start. They have a section for important kanji starting in chapter 3 and further reading practice. I recommend using it even if the rest of your class isn't. First pic related is a an example.

For vocab I use Quizlet. I use the 'learn' tool until I get 100%, and occasionally come back to old chapters to refresh my memory on them. Second pic related is how I set up the cards: The Japanese side has two parts: the word written in the most common way (kanji or romaji if applicable), and the word written in kana with an accent mark if the word is accented to show how it's pronounced, seperated by a Japanese comma, unless the word is usually written in kana in which case I merge the sections. The English side is mostly a copy of the English column in the Genki book, so it has a definition and any usage notes in parenthesis.
You don't have to include the accent, that's a personal thing for me. I can link my sets (Lessons 0 to 6 so far) if anyone wants them.

Benjamin Perez
Benjamin Perez

Writing a whole bunch of stuff out like that for each kanji is most likely an unnecessary time sink that could be better spent. I don't imagine you're doing that every time you review a kanji as well, but if so I'd definitely recommend against it. If you want my advice and some basic reasoning about what you could cut, I would completely drop the labels, as you should know what's what since you're writing it and doing so in a regular way. I would drop the stroke order bit since you're inherently learning it by writing the character. There's no need to specifically draw each stroke in a sequence like that because it's not like you're making a reference book to look back on if you forget something. I wouldn't write the on/kun readings, if anything just quickly try to recite them while you write the character out. What's really going to solidify readings in your memory will be reading and vocabulary though. If you've already taken time to learn the radicals separately then I wouldn't bother writing them out as long as you can recognize them in the characters, honestly I never wrote them out alone although I was learning them along the way but if you find it helpful keep it up. Lastly I wouldn't bother with the readings for words in brackets. You won't be referring back to it and noting the reading mentally or verbally as you write should mostly be fine. If it's a reading you have confuse often or an odd reading and you find it helpful then go for it though. If you wanted to save even more time you could simply write just the kanji and not vocabulary as long as you're still learning them in conjunction with one another. Of course different people have different methods, but do consider whether that time could be better spent in a way that helps you learn more, like adding an extra word to learn per character instead of all that labeling.

Austin Thomas
Austin Thomas

it's not like your making a reference book to look back on
No that's exactly what I'm doing. Also writing things down helps you memorize them. And I haven't ahead learned radicals, I'm doing it as I go through the kanji.
None of it takes very long because it's just copied out of a book, with the exception of the radicals because I'm looking up the kanji's etymology.

Jack Parker
Jack Parker

People learn in different ways taking notes actually works surprisingly well for a lot of people.

Angel James
Angel James

Well, it won't be terribly effective to refer to once you start getting past a few hundred characters, let alone 1-2+ thousand and you have to look through 100+ pages with only the order you learned them in to search by. Better off just using a dictionary whenever you want to review the details of a specific character, especially since they'll be more detailed. For example, you're missing readings for multiple characters, both jouyou and non-jouyou readings.

I agree that writing is good for memory and feel it's been a great help to me, but I believe that a lot of what you're writing could be omitted and made more efficient with little drawback. When I started out my note-taking was quite similar for a bit until I streamlined the process. And while I know that 十人十色, I just thought I'd provide some suggestions based on my own experience in which making those omissions had little to no effect on memory while saving plenty of time.

Cooper Adams
Cooper Adams

When I started out my note-taking was quite similar for a bit until I streamlined the process.
Same. I just write out individual kanji now for practice.

Christopher Moore
Christopher Moore

バンプ~

Adrian Clark
Adrian Clark

ホモじゃない
疑念

Jace Williams
Jace Williams

ホモじゃない
彼はホモですか?

Brody Ross
Brody Ross

多分

Landon Peterson
Landon Peterson

If ませんか is an invitation, how do you ask why won't you? Do you need to add なぜ・どうして before it?

Bentley James
Bentley James

That usually works, though なぜ and どうしてtypically are used at the start of a sentence.

Jaxon Davis
Jaxon Davis

I wonder if they toned down the kappa's perviness in the English version. I'm guessing probably, knowing Treehouse.

James Bailey
James Bailey

やべえよ。ホモのお兄ちゃんがショタのお尻を狙ってるぞ。
lmao, what is this game?

Thomas Anderson
Thomas Anderson

どきどきポヤッチオ

Leo Hall
Leo Hall

Would doing Genki give you enough Japanese to play Animal Crossing?

Robert James
Robert James

Just try it.

Landon Barnes
Landon Barnes

I'm /pol/. Nice to meet you! I'm relieved (because) you're not homos.
It checks out, but am I reading it right? Or is it more like
Relax, (because) I'm not a homo.
Or something like that.

Michael Harris
Michael Harris

The second one.

David Howard
David Howard

someone correct me if I'm wrong, but for future reference, I think if he was saying
I'm /pol/. Nice to meet you! I'm relieved because you're not a homo
it would be something like
ホモじゃないから安心している
where he's saying something like "feel free to be relieved" with 安心してくれ

Josiah Barnes
Josiah Barnes

Yeah, してくれ is "do for me", so it's not an action you are doing yourself.

Nathan Bennett
Nathan Bennett

genki 1

これは私の好きな本です - This is my favorite book - What would 嫌いな本 translate to? This is my hated book?

Kevin Thompson
Kevin Thompson

The book that I hate.

Ayden Williams
Ayden Williams

Wouldn't that be 本が嫌い?

Jose Long
Jose Long

That's "I hate books"

Kayden Roberts
Kayden Roberts

(This is) a/the book that I hate.

Sebastian Murphy
Sebastian Murphy

no, that would be saying "I hate books"
嫌いな本 is using 嫌い as a targeted adjective towards (assumedly) a specific book.
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/adjectives

Ian Ross
Ian Ross

Does the phrase もいいです ever get used with the いい in different forms, such as もよくないです? And if yes, does a sentence like 泳いでもよくないですか。 have the same meaning and connotation as a direct English equivalent like 'is swimming not okay?'

Camden Thompson
Camden Thompson

yes

Brandon Ramirez
Brandon Ramirez

始めましょうか
あっ、まだ飲まないでください
メアリーさんも来ると言っていましたから
遅くなってすみません
じゃあ、かんぱい!

What is "なって" from in the above passage? It's a te-form for something but I can't see it in the previous chapter.

Liam Collins
Liam Collins

なる

Kayden Ward
Kayden Ward

Basically, "sorry I'm late"

Owen Gutierrez
Owen Gutierrez

is なって essentially saying "being"?

Jayden Jackson
Jayden Jackson

Relevant section of Tae Kim
guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/surunaru#Using_with_i-adjectives

Josiah Price
Josiah Price

Read the Tae kim link above, but it means "becoming late", and specifically in that context, mary says "Sorry that I've become late"

Ian Sanchez
Ian Sanchez

New firefox disables XUL-based addons
Disables Rikaichan
Disables No-Script
Panders to mobile shit
Alright, now that firefox is shit, what is a good alternative for raikaichan. I know there's an extension for chrome, but I won't go for shit to diarrhea.

Alexander Fisher
Alexander Fisher

Try PaleMoon.
A lot of people fancy WaterFox as well.

Noah Powell
Noah Powell

O forgot I had this saved. It's accurate?

Aiden Mitchell
Aiden Mitchell

They're apparently working on an updated version for new Firefox.
polarcloud.com/getrcx/

Nicholas Mitchell
Nicholas Mitchell

palemoon purposefully doesn't support adnaseam. So don't get it unless you are a good goy who doesn't want to harm corporations

Hunter Barnes
Hunter Barnes

you just have to use different addons or port those xul to web extensions, you can do that right?

Julian Rivera
Julian Rivera

You can disable that however.

Jace Wright
Jace Wright

using a browser that would cuck you like that in the first place

Samuel Murphy
Samuel Murphy

What was the given reasoning for not supporting it?
I can see "it does unnecessary stuff in the background" as a plenty enough of a reason.

Austin Walker
Austin Walker

The problem is that you'd really trust a browser willing to do something stupid because you can "turn it off"? No. It shouldn't be included in the first place.

Levi Jackson
Levi Jackson

Probably because half of them are korean or chinese who are just capitalizing on the popularity of Japanese food.

Evan Green
Evan Green

Whats that called user?

Jaxson Lopez
Jaxson Lopez

Are you playing it on emulator? If yes, could you post a link to download? I can't seem to find it anywhere

Landon Brooks
Landon Brooks

mega.nz/#!DgZ2FQJZ!_-pz6mV8QG4u1lpC9wfH-NJ0YACy7iw_LL3Ls0_W6VA

Jace Richardson
Jace Richardson

chromium is just chrome
it sux and is also a botnet
why would you believe any chart you see on an imageboard

Adam Phillips
Adam Phillips

Isn't Chromium just Chrome's web-rendering engine? Other browsers like Brave are built on chromium. I'm probably wrong though.

Leo Gonzalez
Leo Gonzalez

Thanks user. Appended to the backlog…

Another random question, how can you type Tシャツ without switching to fullwidth, typing T, then back to kana? I tried tshatu, t-shatu, thishatu, but nothing worked.

Henry Robinson
Henry Robinson

How the fuck do you not kill yourself learning Kanji, they all look the same to me, just like all gook look the same

Samuel Wright
Samuel Wright

Try teli-shatsu

Angel Rogers
Angel Rogers

I just switched over to Waterfox. After reinstalling some stuff it's basically the same as FF before the newest upgrade.

It gets easier as you study and see them more.

Oliver Myers
Oliver Myers

If you just use Microsoft IME as I do then probably won't do what you want by default either. But here's a couple options: Type T, hit enter, then type シャツ. If the T being fullwidth bothers you I believe you can change something in the options to default all latin alphabet to halfwidth. You can also add a word to the IME through right clicking it on the taskbar and "Add Word." As far as quick switching for other individual things, the F6-F10 keys are a shortcut to convert the selection between different formats quickly. I like to use those for katakana words. Very convenient. It will even do a kana mix or capitalization if you press the key multiple times. Like say you wanted to type イく like your favorite animes do, but it doesn't convert. Just type いく then hit F6 or F7 twice and you've got it. You could use that to quickly covert the T for Tシャツ to halfwidth if you wanted as well.

Sebastian Bennett
Sebastian Bennett

I've realized that I overlooked the dash in that post initially and it does work, but more options never hurts anyway.

Kevin Morales
Kevin Morales

Works, thanks

I use mozc most of the time (which is AFAIK more or less the open source version google IME available for other platforms), I rarely have to type something on windows.

That いくF6 F6 (or F7 F7) trick doesn't seem to work, only いF7く. Still faster than messing with the menus though.

Joshua Mitchell
Joshua Mitchell

As you continue to learn more and more kanji you will start to notice how they are always build up from the same smaller compontents, which makes them gradually easier to differentitate and not just see them as random doodles.

Andrew Flores
Andrew Flores

With Anki do i need to learn Katakana and how do i type out the way to say numbers?
Also with Anki do i do the 1m button if i don't know the word or just do 1d?

Parker Jones
Parker Jones

again if you got it wrong
hard if you barely got it right
good if you confidently got it right

Ethan Lee
Ethan Lee

どもうありがとうmr robato

Dominic King
Dominic King

Is somewhere that tells me if this is said like "ni" (the number) or is that kanji?

Jackson Wilson
Jackson Wilson

How long does it take to proficiently read Kanji?
I'm on two weeks now and I know the kana so far. But every text in Japanese is like 80% Kanji and it is just fucking unreadable to me

Dominic Moore
Dominic Moore

Dude, you should have learned Hiragana and Katakana BEFORE everything else, otherwise you will get nowhere. I suggest you stop with the Anki-deck for now, memorize Kana until you can read it flawlessely and then go back to Anki again.

Carter Rogers
Carter Rogers

Depends on how you study, but maybe about a year or so to get started reading.

Ryder Bennett
Ryder Bennett

Ok, how do you read numbers on anki cause they show the same number but it has 2 different sayings

Landon Howard
Landon Howard

a year
guess I'll be stuck playing childrens games and reading childrens comics

Angel Bailey
Angel Bailey

I say just focus on learning kanji and vocab for now. You don't want to slog through all-kana text.

Robert Torres
Robert Torres

Under the english translation it´s written down in Hiragana how you pronounce the words. And i´m pretty sure that the anki deck has audio support as well, or what do you mean?

The general advice here is to start reading when you have learned around 2000 words. But of course it´s entirely up to you. And you still will have to look up a lot of words at this stage anyway. Just hang in there user. Learning a language is hard but not impossible.

Asher Mitchell
Asher Mitchell

Good thing I don't really use that anymore. I mainly used it to look up kanji readings but now I use this site kanji.reader.bz/ instead.

Matthew Morales
Matthew Morales

fucking hell I hope this is a joke

Charles Lewis
Charles Lewis

Private tracker is having a freeleech, you guys want this?

Ryan Reyes
Ryan Reyes

wouldn't mind it

Luke Stewart
Luke Stewart

Dubs
Where do I upload this thing, you guys have a Vola?

Austin Roberts
Austin Roberts

just upload to /r/HF33Go

It's the Holla Forumsolafile

Parker Moore
Parker Moore

user, "Ni" kanji is this 「に」 but you also has this vocab「二つ」 and you pronounce it as 「ふたつ」 and the reason for this is that even though they both mean 2 they have different meanings and uses. It is a bit complicated and this is not even the only instance you will see this. but it is the easiest.
「一」 is pronounced as 「いち」 while 「一つ」 is pronounced as 「ひとつ」
「三」 is pronounced as 「さん」 while 「三つ」 is pronounced as 「みつ」
And then you have this
「一日」which means "First day (Of the week)" and is pronounced「ついたち」
「二日」which means "Second day (Of the week)" and is pronounced「ふつか」
「三日」which means "Third day (Of the week)" and is pronounced「みっか」
And so on and so forth. Translated they mean the same but japs use the one that adds 「つ」 as a counter, so when you are counting things Which is why you see (things) in the meaning you're supposed to use or say these forms, not the simple numbers.
And you better fucking learn it, faggot, it's important, since even though they are the same kanji with the same meaning, when they are in compounds, even though the meaning is mostly the same, the pronunciation can vary, which is why learning kanji alone is retarded. However, they usually have patron so you can easily deduce not only what it means but sometimes how it is pronounced. I hope this helps.

Camden Reyes
Camden Reyes

To illustrate my point, pay attention to the opening of Monster Musume, I learned it there, since they pronounce them as they count until 4, I believe, but it's still helpful.

Bentley Moore
Bentley Moore

Done, sorry about all those other uploads.

John White
John White

volafile.org/get/o4dgqpViGTvM/kodansha-kanji-learners-course-pdf.pdf

Didn't realize I could just link it here.

Blake Gray
Blake Gray

Have this random conjugation chart.

Bentley Bailey
Bentley Bailey

Learn fewer at a time, learn them as a supplement to actual vocab, break them down into parts and learn what all those parts mean in order to form more mental connections
See

Anthony Green
Anthony Green

バンプ~

Aiden Morales
Aiden Morales

Thanks a'lot this clears up my confusion with counting.
Came along this en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_counter_word it shows the different ways to count things and the way to pronounce いとつ to 十
This is pretty good at telling me how to pronounce the words thanks desu.

Cameron Martin
Cameron Martin

I meant ひとつpls no bully

Dominic Cox
Dominic Cox

Don't worry, re-reading the post I committed a few errors myself.
user, "Ni" kanji is this 「に」 but you also has this vocab
The kanji is 「二」 not 「に」 this is the hiragana.
「一日」which means "First day (Of the week)"
It's first day of the month, not the week.

Benjamin Cook
Benjamin Cook

「いじめないでください」と言うと俺はいじめてあげたくなるよ

Brody Hernandez
Brody Hernandez

いじめるが悪いからしないでよ
日本語学習スレは優しい所はず

Aaron Stewart
Aaron Stewart

でも、楽しいだよ~

Gabriel Parker
Gabriel Parker

I thought you can´t put だ directly behind an i-adjective or is that wrong?

Justin White
Justin White

No you're right, I remembered that like a second after posting.

Brody Parker
Brody Parker

would it be correct if you were to use たのしいんだ?

Sebastian Diaz
Sebastian Diaz

Is there actually a reason for that though? It seems like a really random rule. But then again, most languages have a lot of randomness to them.

Sebastian Rodriguez
Sebastian Rodriguez

I think so.

No idea.

Jeremiah Russell
Jeremiah Russell

The rule is "da will not appear after an i-adjective" not because it's technically wrong to do so, but because "da" is only used in informal speech where just using the adjective is enough to convey the meaning anyway.
In other words, it happens because of you're in a context informal enough to use da, you're in a context informal enough to not use a copula at all unless it's necessary.

Lucas Rogers
Lucas Rogers

It is technically wrong, and a stereotypical hallmark of the speech of morons in games and manga.

Jack White
Jack White

I guess it would be more correct you say "it is only wrong because of stylistic and register conventions, not because of any deeper grammatical conflict."

Sebastian Young
Sebastian Young

kamen rider my dude.

Austin Richardson
Austin Richardson

Whenever I put new words into anki, I have a hard time remembering the words. I forget them after a few seconds and have to keep pressing "again" until they are the last cards. How do I remember new words better? I seem to forget a word 10 seconds after I see it.

Brody Phillips
Brody Phillips

You just keep at it until you remember them. It sometimes takes me days until I finally remember a new word.

Camden Wood
Camden Wood

Do most of you even bother with writing kanji?
I do find it that it adds a better level of understanding it and remember it and most definitely being able to tell it apart from something very similar.

Aiden White
Aiden White

Every day.

Thomas Flores
Thomas Flores

Yeah, i always practice writing Kanji. My handwriting sucks generally but it makes repeating the anki deck more fun for me and i definitely can remember the words better if i have to write them down regularly.

Charles Howard
Charles Howard

try breaking them down into kanji, and breaking those kanji into radicals using Wiktionary.
This gives the potential to form new connections between the information in your head, which your brain is likely to latch onto, making remembering the information easier.

I use a drawn input on my phone to force myself to learn kanji.

Nicholas Gray
Nicholas Gray

Wrong. It's incorrect because of grammatical conflict. Copula is only used with nouns and adjectival nouns.
The い ending of adjectives is basically already the same thing, making the だ redundant.

Josiah Myers
Josiah Myers

No you're wrong. The polite and literary forms of the copula です and であります do occur after i-adjectives. だ is the only copula form that doesn't and that's because of register convention.

Isaac Diaz
Isaac Diaz

Yes. I write every new kanji/vocab word out by hand a few times. I also try to write out a few full sentences by hand every week too. I think it's really helpful. I'd like to do it even more but it's pretty time consuming writing a lot of shit, especially if trying to only do it from memory.

Easton Lee
Easton Lee

Does a comma (読点) guarantee a verbal pause, or is it like an English comma where it may or may not indicate a verbal pause?

Christopher Walker
Christopher Walker

new thread

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