Vidya in the future

Christopher Butler
Christopher Butler

What do you think videogames will be like in 30 years? Just like they are now with higher detail graphics? Drastically different? Will current input methods (controllers + m&kb) remain the standard? Will games get better or worse?

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Adrian Hill
Adrian Hill

All games will be designed for handheld phones with two buttons - one for each thumb. VR will be attached to all of them.

Parker Green
Parker Green

I was going to say a bunch of shit about mobile freemium, pay2win, extreme jewery with items, cosmetics and gambling but realized that's the present.

Bentley Lee
Bentley Lee

VR will fail over the next 5 years, be untouched for another 15 years, then actually take off in 30 years

Kayden Russell
Kayden Russell

The hardware for rendering is enough right now, but the technology for actually interacting with it isn't- too expensive, and too simplistic. You can only control position/rotation of your head and hands with an $800+ setup. Utterly ridiculous, no fucking wonder it has almost zero adoption rate.

Ryder Sanders
Ryder Sanders

Probably cease to exist because nukes destroyed all technology.

Nathaniel Jackson
Nathaniel Jackson

We live in an age where innovation has declined and stagnated. I do not see a bright future for vidya until a serious crash happens with a bunch of companies going under because of their own incompetence. But that won't happen because of the casual audience very rarely ever learning and just throwing their money away like nothing. It's sad.

Owen Robinson
Owen Robinson

What do you think videogames will be like in 30 years?

Shit

Eli Bennett
Eli Bennett

People spend that much on an iPad. I don't think it's going to get terribly less expensive for the gamer/enthusiast spec. There will be cheapo VR things like cardboard though that can't play anything good.

Leo Flores
Leo Flores

There will be cheapo VR things like cardboard though that can't play anything good.
Most mobile phones these days have decent enough specs to be used as a VR screen, only thing is there isn't really any proper software for screencasting from a desktop (without shit resolution, lag, or low fps).

Joshua Hughes
Joshua Hughes

That's not going to be sustainable for the next 30 years. It's all in a giant bubble, it'll burst.

The whole thing is going to collapse in the next 30 years. All these companies in it for making money are going to disappear when they find something more profitable.

Isaac Reed
Isaac Reed

Mainstream games will take up the Netflix model within the next 15 years, where you have to pay a monthly fee in exchange for being able to play a selection of games. I like to think that underground archival communities will still exist to preserve and distribute games that are removed from rotation, but they may be targeted heavily by anti-piracy laws.

Kevin Perry
Kevin Perry

Sony is already doing that with Playstation Now.

Blake Robinson
Blake Robinson

Think about cars thirty years ago: they're basically the same as they are now. More power windows, locks, and steering, sure, maybe more extras like some kind of an air ventilation to keep the inside of cars not murderously hot in the summer, but still on four wheels, still on the ground, and still using pedals and mirrors. Games in the future may be more massive and detailed, but i doubt they'll be much different; best case scenario, VR goggles and full-hand controllers not entirely unlike the Wii controls.

Ayden Collins
Ayden Collins

Game production costs will have increased so much that every major release for an established series is considered a 'celebrational' game honoring its legacy rather than a new installment, with smaller games by smaller teams coming out more frequently and with very little gameplay additions

Consoles and handhelds will have merged in a similar way to the Switch but Sony's lacks motion control and Microsoft's is bulkier and intended for larger groups, assuming they're still in the business. Atari returns, thrives, then falls off again. Sega only ever makes Sonic games if they partner up with and get funding from a larger company first

New IPs are relegated to phones, independent publisher releases on Steam or digital downloads for online stores, allowing companies to test the waters for any new ideas. Occasionally one of the new indie IPs will do so well that a company picks them up to make a better game, but they rarely go through

Story-driven games become more rampant, several new releases are about wandering in open worlds with a first-person perspective finding secrets and mysteries and no enemies or obstacles. Arcade type games make a return but are disposable, cheaply made, and rarely get any attention. Immersive VR is still a work-in-progress and trying to afford every piece of hardware for it requires you pay an arm, a leg, and a kidney, and most of the games for VR are the exploratory ones mentioned above

E3 is only accessible via VR where people can watch the conferences in real-time through their headsets. Conferences are restricted to only one hour each with most of that time spent talking about the advancements each dev has made with VR technology. Indie games get no screentime, only trailers that are shown via streaming and brief mentions in the published details at the end of each conference

Christian Bell
Christian Bell

all these bad vvibes
Babby's first cynic.

Owen Parker
Owen Parker

What do you think videogames will be like in 30 years?
even more garbage than they are now, regarding the mainstream titles. yearly releases might get reduced to every 6 months and those animal normalfags and casuals will allow for even further corporate fuckery to pick apart games and sell them in as many pieces as possible

or

normalfags get bored of video games and a new entertainment medium starts to take over, maybe something using AR aspects, so more traditional video games get a bump in quality but are produces far less frequently

Ayden Walker
Ayden Walker

I've got mixed feelings about the future of videogames. In terms of the recent future, we're most likely going to see more games push the F2P or DLC heavy models, we'll probably see a lot more games published exclusively through digital distribution services and what happens with VR in the upcoming future is anyone's guess at this point. Not to mention as this user stated innovation has declined and we're in something of a stage of stagnation.

On the topic of F2P and DLC heavy models, f the economy goes to shit in the next 15 years, DLC heavy games will only serve to alienate consumers who don't have too much money (which would more than likely be a good percentage of people who play videogames), meaning these types of games would either have to tone down the DLC and start including more content with the base game or switch to a F2P model with less expensive micro-transactions. Regarding F2P, I personally buy into the idea that this user is pushing. I firmly believe that there will be too many F2P games and too many casual/tablet/smartphone games for the consumer to handle. The total profits of the videogame market will be stretched too thin by the strain of over saturation, leading to no overall victor within the market and leading to a lack of further development and uniqueness from development studios due to a lack of profit. This scenario would be similar to the material conditions that led to the crash of the mid 1980s, in which companies were simply churning out basic, easily replicated games on equally basic and easily replicated hardware, what little innovation and unique selling points there may have been were of little consequence as there were simply too many nearly identical consoles for consumers to choose from. Perhaps after a new crash (or at the very least a severe slump) some of the publishing houses and developers who are only in it to get rich quick, will either end up bankrupt or move on to something else entirely. Hopefully this would open up the market for studios that actually give a damn about their fans and we'd see a new generation of innovative and overall fun videogames.

With regards to distribution, I'd argue that for the next 10 years there's probably going to be a push for more digital distribution, probably on the grounds of anti-piracy, money saving measures, convenience etc. Hell, I bet in the next decade we'll see a high selling console with no physical media port, in an attempt to push this idea of purely digital media. However, I'd argue that about 20 years from now we'll see a backlash from it, like with the music industry right now, where Vinyl has become popular once more. With nearly every major album release getting a high quality vinyl pressing. Its currently happening now with retro games, but I reckon in time it'll start happening with new releases. Simply producing a physical copy will become a unique selling point for a short period, before all the publishers start doing it again.

Finally, VR. I'm uncertain as to where VR will go in the near future. VR exclusive games have already been demonstrated as being completely unsustainable and the high price tag of VR headsets are a major put off for most people. I think VR is going to be slow going, it most likely won't get truly mass appeal until the technology and as a result the headsets themselves become cheaper and a little less bulkier. People are interested in VR, they just don't want to pay an arm and a leg. They also don't want to look stupid while wearing a VR headset either, so someone will have to work on making them aesthetically pleasing as well.

Camden Mitchell
Camden Mitchell

It is impossible not to look stupid while using VR. They better accept that and move on.

James Scott
James Scott

An actual vidya crash wouldn't do shit in the current year, even if (((big companies))) had a reason to go away, nowadays self-publishing and dev worshipal have become so easy, that any TV reject indieshit hack could simply create the next shiny meme game and reanimate the industry in a few days just like it was before that crash, or even worse.
The best option is to hold onto your old games and appreciate any modern, good niche/semi-niche games you find nowadays. There will be a time where good games will no longer be made and the jews will start attacking old games, that time hasn't come yet, but you will not notice anything until it's too late.

Dylan Howard
Dylan Howard

I got this.
Refresh rates: 120hz in 2011. 144 hz in 2014. 240 hz in current year 2017. 420 hz in 2020. 840 hz in 2024, 1000hz in 2027.
resolution: 4k 120hz current year & Display Port 1.4. 4k 240hz 2019 compatible possibly, bandwidth bottleneck @ DP 1.4. 8k 60 hz on market in 2020. 4k becomes available easily 60-120hz in 2018.

GPU: Each generation only goes up 15% or 25%. You do the math.

Game Engines: Further advancements and more features, realism pushed very much, possible Phd's who made physics engines that were made for Fluid simulation might be paid to build game engines. Venture into dynamic and minute particles, smaller as the years go on due to computing increase.

VR advances in above aspects, VR price goes down relative to console prices, becomes marketable and therefore good developers begin joining the scene, which is why games suck right now.

Engineers make further attempts in designing the optimum controller for use in games, and more cheap sensors that allow for body tracking.

As time goes on, the chance a good game to come out increases. Hopefully a good game due to the new things above can create a new genre that is genuinely fun.

Easton King
Easton King

dead, hopefully!

Wyatt James
Wyatt James

Literally won't exist due to the rise of mobile gaming.

Juan Kelly
Juan Kelly

I can't even remember what I thought videogames would be in the future before the decline of innovation. Now it's all about finding more ways to gouge customers while selling a cheaper made product. We have the technology, but no one bothers to push it to the limit anymore.

Nicholas Young
Nicholas Young

The anti-consumer practices of this day and age won't last forever. I don't know when it will happen, maybe even not in the next 30 years, but eventually the industry will crash and be reborn into something half-decent again.

Samuel Evans
Samuel Evans

I think a game dev revolution will occure. Consumers/fans will take it upon themselves to learn game development and distribute games on independent platforms, such as itch.io and gamejolt, without the backing of a publisher.

These games will be consumer friendly. They'll either be free or priced competively compared to the current AAA industry.

It seems to be happening already. it seems to be a question of time when it'll fully come to fruition.

Owen Lopez
Owen Lopez

More like the jews/bourgs will run out of third worlders to churn out electronics and other shit to sell to consumer goys. So they'll instead push harder and harder to legislate away any freedom we have to make us totally dependent on them for entertainment and other frivolities. Anyone who tries to fight back will be destroyed and turned into nutrients.

Blake Robinson
Blake Robinson

You're half right.

For example- didn't the GuiltyGear guy say something like "this cel-shading tech has been around for years, no one was doing anything with it."

IMO, as markets rise and crash, eventually a renaissance will occur. With Shovel Knight, Duck-Tales, Crash Bandicoot, and hopefully Sonic Mania (as long as Denuvo isn't in it), even marketing people will eventually realize "they want older style games."
Sure you'll get some trying to imitate rather than learn what made them good- but it'll happen eventually.
And that's not even including how Jap games keep beating out western games every time.

Nothing lasts forever. Not even bad-times.

Mason Allen
Mason Allen

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James Lopez
James Lopez

Spend 35 8chips for my answer
You can buy them in packs of 4000 8chips at a time for 35 dollars each.

Luis Sullivan
Luis Sullivan

Hopefully dead, but realistically only very rarely does something diminish to nothing. I'm gonna stream of consciousness this post since I have no point to make and I've been up all night.

A resurgence of tabletop would be pretty nice (minus the ideologue infiltration). Something where people could get together with a sort of VR "eyes with hands" interface and play that way might be a thing. "Emergent gameplay" is a buzzphrase that'll make a comeback long before 30 years from now, where games will have puddle deep mechanics coupled with hundreds of lines of rules/conditions that players can abuse to win (see Boardgame Online). "Full dive" VR won't be a thing available to the consumer market in my lifetime. Slower games will be more of a thing than the mechanical skill driven games like shooters and racers. FPS specifically are seeing a decline, but that could be more of an immediate future thing and they could definitely make a comeback in 30 years. But this would all be really niche stuff come 30 years since the only computer people are likely to own by that point is their phone. Pretty sure the new tech bubble would have popped before then and wiped out every third-party "virtual goods" outlet alive today, excluding the walled garden shops kept alive by the phone manufacturers. Whoever manufacturers phones and provides the network infrastructure for them now is going to be alive in 30 years time. The rest is up in the air.

The internet will transform more and more into an extended intranet used by employers as a bulletin board than by sanfran/cupertino tech companies that sustain themselves by turning the masses into 0-hour contract employees that make their money from them through ads and cat videos. People will primarily get their internet through their phones, the only reason they need it being so they can get their week's work schedule as the western world slips into irreversible economic decline and moral decay.

tl;dr Comps/consoles will be niche as fuck in 30 years. Multiplayer on those platforms will be as dead as a door-nail. Hope you're a workaholic.

Ian Torres
Ian Torres

You're a fucking idiot.

Austin Roberts
Austin Roberts

Thanks

Hudson Thomas
Hudson Thomas

The vidya crash that anons have been predicting for over a decade is never going to happen. The market is going to continually grow as corporations find new ways to nickle and dime consumers. Consumers who will be all too eager to hand over their shekels for some immersive escapism that lets them forget how bad things really are until they go to sleep and wake up for another day of wageslavery. Television used to fill that niche, but the new generation demands more stimulation and has very little tolerance for ads, so they're cutting the cord with cable and going for netflix and vidya.