Linux or BSD

Ayden Robinson
Ayden Robinson

Linux or BSD?

All urls found in this thread:
https://alpinelinux.org/downloads/
http://minimal.linux-bg.org/
https://www.gnu.org/software/shepherd/
https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en/books/handbook/
http://docs.openindiana.org/handbook/getting-started/
Eli Edwards
Eli Edwards

For a desktop: MacOS (BSD)
For a server: BSD
For some shitty linode type box: Linux (Fedora/OpenSUSE)

Jace Jones
Jace Jones

I'd just like to interject for moment. What you're refering to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called Linux, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project.

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called Linux distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux!

Ryder Miller
Ryder Miller

As a Gentoo user and an OpenBSD user... Either. If I was looking for something for a server or headless machine or even just a desktop for programming and daily work, I'd use OpenBSD.

But that doesn't boot well off Libreboot, so I use Gentoo. Linux is also nicer to configure and easier to use, methinks.

Kevin Edwards
Kevin Edwards

I would highly recommend Debian. While not endorsed officially by GNU due to having an entirely optional nonfree repo, it is in every other sense a fully free operating system. It is highly versatile, with most desktop environments supported, as well as a minimal netinstall. It can function well as a server, with the default installation being very stable, or can be made more up to date by switching to testing or unstable. It also supports x86, arm, mips, openpower, and even some IBM mainframe systems.

Adam Edwards
Adam Edwards

OpenBSD for everything, pretty much. I like debian and other shinier distros and occasionally check them out, but ultimately I just feel .. dirty .. running anything other than obsd. 6.2 was just released (hours ago.)

I disagree with you about configuration. I find linux configuration unnecessarily complex, compared to openbsd. Too much shit going on. It's like pf vs. iptables.

I'm thinking about trying this smartos thing out. Looks interesting.

Joseph Cruz
Joseph Cruz

I find linux configuration unnecessarily complex
For you.
It's like pf vs. iptables.
pf is kinda retarded compared netfilter. At least it's faster than iptables. OBSD still needed pledge to prevent random binaries to reach the socket, but it's still not too sophisticated.

Tyler Cruz
Tyler Cruz

Free as in systemD.

Daniel Cox
Daniel Cox

What's the point of BSD?
Is it binary compatible with gnunix?

Michael Morris
Michael Morris

quick rundown on *bsd? why open and not freebsd?

Kayden Price
Kayden Price

Several fire exit if something gone wild with GNU/Linux.

Julian Williams
Julian Williams

Indeed. Systemd is Free Software, licensed under the GPL. That said, some people do not like systemd on a technical level, which is why the Devuan project exists.

Jace Martin
Jace Martin

Linux is not an operating system, it's a kernel; so the comparison makes no sense.
If you wish to compare *BSD to something, GNU would be a better thing to compare it to.
GNU does not follow the UNIX philosophy and doesn't care about it. GNU was created to realize Stallman's dream of a free as in freedom operating system.
*BSD, on the other hand, doesn't care at all about free as in freedom software (though most of it's software does respect the user's freedoms) but cares deeply about the UNIX philosophy and all it's software is engineered in such a way.
In a nutshell: use GNU if you care about software freedom but not about the UNIX philosophy, use *BSD if you care about the UNIX philosophy but not software freedom.

Thomas Turner
Thomas Turner

BSD is an open source clone of Unix operating systems, made to be 100 % compatible with it.
GNU is a free as in freedom operating system, made to respect the user's freedom. It's POSIX compliant because Stallman wanted to make it easier for developers to port over their existing projects, but coreutils (and most of GNU software) do not follow the UNIX philosophy and that sometimes creates inconsistencies when trying to port back.
*BSD does run a GNU compatibility layer not unlike Wine, so most GNU software (excluding stuff like systemd) runs flawlessly.

William Lewis
William Lewis

systemd isn't a GNU software.
creates inconsistencies when trying to port back
Elaborate.

Adam Stewart
Adam Stewart

0 1
these bits are freedom
GNUts

Blake Collins
Blake Collins

You're right. What I should have said is that systemd relies on the Linux kernel which by itself doesn't follow the UNIX philosophy and can't be ported to other kernels (or maybe it can, but nobody has done it.)
elaborate
A bash script or any program that relies on nonstandard functions from GNU coreutils or other GNU libraries must be modified in order to be run by non-GNU systems.

Blake Young
Blake Young

Unfortunately OpenBSD is not an option for me as I run a newer Nvidia card. Settled on PC BSD, or whatever they're calling it now.

Connor Thompson
Connor Thompson

as I run a newer Nvidia card
You might as well use Windows if you don't care about your freedom and just run proprietary binary blobs everywhere.

Blake Stewart
Blake Stewart

cuck license
ever

Robert Ward
Robert Ward

But I thought Linux+GNU were POSIX compliant? In which case how much more is there to do?

John Gutierrez
John Gutierrez

so if someone were to transition from Linux to BSD, maybe to just try it out, how big of a leap are we talking?

Windows to Linux leap? Or more like switching from Debian to Fedora sort of things to get used to?

Aiden Clark
Aiden Clark

If you are using something like ubuntu or debian it's like transitioning from windows to linux again. This is because you need to use the command line more and you have to RTFM or manpages.

If you use something like arch or gentoo then it's painless other then less hardware support.

Hudson Rogers
Hudson Rogers

less hardware support.

So tossing some BSD variant on a laptop to take it for a spin will result in things like no wireless support, perhaps no support for trackpad mouse, and other such fun things?

Aiden Rodriguez
Aiden Rodriguez

More like in a worst case scenario you don't get a accelerated 3d desktop and can't play games except emulators with binary blobs. Their hardware support is alright it's just graphics and rarely audio that breaks or has no drivers. Maybe if you are using the newest super l33t wifi cards from intel you might not get wifi, only ethernet.

Alexander Martinez
Alexander Martinez

Yeah you need to do a bit of research to make sure your system is supported.

Parker Bennett
Parker Bennett

*BSD is not about software freedom but rather minimalist, functional open source software. He made the right call by using a *BSD. GNU is for those who care about the 4 freedoms that Stallman talks about.
It is mostly POSIX compliant. It just adds some new features not present on other Unix systems.

Caleb Lewis
Caleb Lewis

So still viable to explore in a 5 year old laptop that was mid-tier at best at its time? Which spin to you recommend? Which is the most widely supported and noob friendly, I guess i'm asking.

It is mostly POSIX compliant. It just adds some new features not present on other Unix systems.

So what I have to wonder about that is how can that be considered a bad thing? Is there some strict benefit to limiting only to being POSIX compliant? If the extensions beyond those standards/boundaries provide a better environment should they not be adopted?
Am I looking at this from the wrong angle?

Isaiah Hughes
Isaiah Hughes

Which is the most widely supported and noob friendly
FreeBSD for sure.
Is there some strict benefit to limiting only to being POSIX compliant?
It means if you have the source for it and it runs on mac or linux you can run it on the BSD's if you compile it yourself with dependencies. Open sound system is a excellent example. You can make it work on all the POSIX compliant kernels as long as a compatibilty layer is in place.

Landon King
Landon King

For old weak machines you don't wish to update: Debian/Ubuntu LTS
For your own personal non-normie machines: Arch/Void and Gentoo/SourceMage

Nicholas Morris
Nicholas Morris

ignore me, I'm just a massive fucking faggot who literally cannot stop sucking dicks.

Nathan Torres
Nathan Torres

apt is garbage though, both in terms of speed and usage design.

Half the feature are broken and don't work either. For instance, getting a base Debian install require you export the pkg list from a fresh install and import it later. Guess what though, importing apt pkg lists is completely broken.

You'd need to manually sed and awk (or perl) your list with the new list and manually issue uninstall and install commands yourself. Trash I only put up with because it has support.

Carter Stewart
Carter Stewart

I will say package management definitely seems cleaner on BSD.

Bentley Thomas
Bentley Thomas

I've never had this problem....

Brody Roberts
Brody Roberts

/usr/ports are easy to understand, but it's not so simple for a normie to grasp, and also updating can be a nuisance if you're doing it manually. There's a few solutions for this, but my favorite for managing ports builds is Synth. Coded in Ada no less!

Anthony James
Anthony James

It also makes it a shit ton easier to have a mixed system. Also I must admit I love AppCafe. Simple as shit gui frontend for pkg. Unlike the bloated mess Linux "app stores" have become.

Jason Perry
Jason Perry

Yes. Just not Wangblows or FagOS tbh.

Aaron Foster
Aaron Foster

mixed system
Just to clarify what you mean for people new to BSD like OP. By mixed he means having some programs installed via the ports tree, while others are from pre-compiled packages. This used to result in a big mess. Synth gets around this by copying built ports into a local package repository, which plays well with the existing installed packages. You can also set synth to fetch remote packages if they are both available and you have not manually configured that port. If you're on a weak machine, using remote packages for X11 packages is recommended, saves a lot of time!

Oliver Lewis
Oliver Lewis

IMHO, BSD doesn't go far enough on the "minimalist, stable, functional" scale, and keeps a lot old UNIX atavisms and assumptions that just don't make sense in today's environment.
This is especially noticeable in default configurations for various software.
Some of it just screams "This will run perfectly on VAX-11/780!"

Brandon Edwards
Brandon Edwards

Especially whatever that monstrosity is that Ubuntu are creating.
Install package
< Prompt: First you must login to your Ubuntu account!
Nope, nope nope...

Daniel Stewart
Daniel Stewart

Is there some strict benefit to limiting only to being POSIX compliant?
Compatibility between POSIX compliant systems.
The more non-compliant features you add on top, the harder porting software gets.
systemd is prime example of this. It relies heavily on Linux-only features, which makes it practically unportable.
And BSD guys suddenly got a lot of busywork patching it out of software that started relying on it.

If the extensions beyond those standards/boundaries provide a better environment should they not be adopted?
More features in the standard make standard more complicated and harder to implement correctly.
W3C went along with this kitchen-sink approach, and now not even such massive companies like Google and Mozilla are capable of keeping up with it despite massive bloat and security issues, while millions of pajeets spend counltless hours rewirting every page for every version of every major browser.

Christian Lewis
Christian Lewis

"minimalist, stable, functional"
BSD doesn't go far enough

I don't understand your points.

I only use obsd (since about a year after it split from netbsd), so I can't comment much on free/net. But, my last install .iso was around 350MB. That's pretty minimalist, as is 'ps ax' on a default install. Lines of code? There is just no comparison.

In terms of stability, you're on glue. BSD boxes are usually definitively stable.

As far as functionality, I guess there may be some argument there but I don't really see it. If anything, you have to appreciate their commitment to supporting legacy stuff. The vax arch was only recently retired, in fact. That's a little insane, but it speaks volumes as to the work quality they do, the lengths they will go to not fuck you if you happen to be running older hardware.

I hear i386 support is going away for some of the popular linux distros. You think the BSDs are going to pull that shit?

In summary, there is one OS to rule them all and its name is OpenBSD.

Kayden Nguyen
Kayden Nguyen

I just think there's still a lot of room for improvement.

For example https://alpinelinux.org/downloads/
- extended: 330 MB
- standard: 106 MB
- vanilla: 84 MB

So, there's sure some fat to trimm.

Or even http://minimal.linux-bg.org/
- prebuild image: 6.8 MB

Yeah, it's just a kernel + libc + busybox, basically. But what else do you need?
And I still think it's too big of a footprint, tbh.
If BSD guys had same dedication, we'd be running full graphical environment from floppies right now.

James Sanchez
James Sanchez

Always room for improvement, I agree. You must like the suckless.org stuff.

I am not sure how an arch distro compares to OpenBSD in terms of functionality, so I don't know how they compare (and whether we are talking apples to apples.) I can't comment knowledgeably. I would guess you could get an OBSD cut down to similar size, if you wanted to. Also, Arch is a bit of an exception. Most distros are significantly larger (and DO provide a lot more apps than a base obsd install, so again, it's not a fair comparison.)

In the end, for me, security, code correctness (and all the auditing), stability, simplicity, consistency, documentation, and a general adherence to unix principles always makes obsd stand out for me. I never have problems with it (except when I create them myself, like say forgetting to update 6.1 packages between a 6.0-6.2 upgrade.)

It has its warts here and there, sure, but it's a proven old warhorse (in a time when you want an armored steed, to be sure.)

Bentley Wright
Bentley Wright

You can cut down any of the BSDs into the 6MB-8MB range, if you really want to.

But what else do you need?
The rest of the OS would be nice. You know: file management, text processing, and a C compiler.

Angel Gray
Angel Gray

OpenBSD does not allow kernel modules as they are a security risk, so they compile all their drivers into the kernel, which makes it fat.
You could compile your own, as well as removing any userland stuff you don't want, to make it skinnier.

Carson Perez
Carson Perez

6.8 MB is still rather fat. Make defconfig enables many unnecessary options, especially if you're visualizing. Busybox along with it's init implementation is also a bad choice. Sbase and ubase from the suckless guys are more minimal than busybox. Uclibc or musl with static linking should be used instead of glibc. Runsvdir or something like it should also be used.

Liam Butler
Liam Butler

As someone with who doesn't care about 'free as in freedom'(only that its open-source), windows is utter trash. The only thing keeping windows alive for normies is that it's 'normal' and all their applications don't run on it.

See: that one news clip of a girl failing college bcus her computer came with ubuntu

Angel Roberts
Angel Roberts

as someone who ...

Leo Cook
Leo Cook

muh security
muh correct C
muh "no proprietary binaries distributed within kernel", just used outside it
muh non-communist license
muh not associated with as many sexual predators
muh not apple-cucked
There is no POSIX compliant FOSS un*x, because POSIX requires money and returning to some standards that are silly. Most are POSIX-Enough, so you're mostly right.

James Smith
James Smith

I'd just like to interject for moment

I'd just like to interject for moment. What you're refering to as GNU/Linux, is in fact, GNU/GNU/GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU/GNU plus GNU/Linux. GNU/Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU/GNU system made useful by the GNU/GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX.

Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU/GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU/GNU which is widely used today is often called GNU/Linux, and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU/GNU system, developed by the GNU/GNU Project.

There really is a GNU/Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. GNU/Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. GNU/Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU/GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU/GNU with GNU/Linux added, or GNU/GNU/GNU/Linux. All the so-called GNU/Linux distributions are really distributions of GNU/GNU/GNU/Linux!

Jack Bell
Jack Bell

Actually, it's correct to use Linux this time because both BSD and Linux are kernels and pperating systems using these kernels are being discussed.

Oliver Morales
Oliver Morales

muh vital GNU functions
won't even start without systemd
lol

Isaiah Lopez
Isaiah Lopez

Technically, GNU has an init system.
https://www.gnu.org/software/shepherd/

Luke Cox
Luke Cox

I find it highly embarrassing that Stallman has stalled delivering GNU/Hurd so long.

Andrew Carter
Andrew Carter

general purpose OS or firewall?
Why even ask these things? Everyone knows that the only reason for BSD to exist is pfsense.

Brayden Perez
Brayden Perez

Either OpenBSD, or Illumos (OpenIndiana, SmartOS, OmniOSce, Nexenta, Tribblix).

OpenBSD and Illumos (aka the fork of OpenSolaris the hardcore Solaris engineers made and continue today) are very clean and well written pieces of code. Compare the layouts of the code for the two kernels Illumos and Linux (or ask a competent programmer-friend). I think the attack surfaces of both OpenBSD and Illumos kernels are smaller just because of the cleaner and more correct coding when compared to Free/NetBSD and especially Linux. What does Illumos have on OpenBSD? ZFS, Zones (including ones with full Linux binary compatibility), Crossbow. It had MLS-capable Mandatory Access Controls, but since no spook customers used Solaris anymore (probably because Sun Microsystems ceased to exist) it was deprecated last year and a bunch of the code was gutted. I'm sure the MLS-capable MAC could be re-inserted if someone of a higher calibre than I could patch the code up and make it work in the latest editions, AND be able to semi-competently test it for Orangebook compliance, etc.

Kayden Myers
Kayden Myers

I'm almost positive the shit code and architecture in the Linux Kernel is the cause of many data breaches into the Five-Eyes networks. "Many eyes" may be able to look at a screen full of kernel code, few eyes are trained well enough to spot major architectural bugs. Almost none of the competent eyes can understand the whole kernel anymore. Linus' top-down application of "writing secure code is pointless therefore just make it fast and less crashy" is dangerous. We've entered a period where Windows 7 kernel security surpasses vanilla Linux kernel security for a long time now. The market for exploits attracts the highest skilled troubleshooters for the highest pay, which is a disincentive toward disclosing the vulnerability publicly (at all if not 'too soon'). It is for this reason that the Linux kernel is at best a mild security risk, if not outright security-hostile software. We no longer have PaX, which opens a can of worms for the Linux community. I'm sure as more kernels get upgraded to versions which don't have PaX, the number of break-ins for Linux will increase.

Some string of major vulnerabilities found in Linux which resulted in catastrophe in the real world might startle the industry into considering saner alternatives, like Illumos or OpenBSD. OpenBSD could use a feature-fork for MAC implementation though IMO. Maybe make it a pun and call it 'ClosedBSD'...

Evan Kelly
Evan Kelly

turn on your flag so I can filter you

Xavier Rivera
Xavier Rivera

The FSF's biggest mistake was accepting Linux as GNU's "official" kernel. The whole point of GNU was to create a free operating system, but then you have a bunch of retards calling it "Linux" and associating it with an open source program made by a student in it's spare time.
Not only Linux stalled the production of the HURD (a kernel that is better technically speaking), it totally undermined GNU's purpose and buried the FSF in the Linux Foundation's shadow.
They should have chosen kFreeBSD instead, or a fork of Linux. It would have been better for everyone.

Leo Harris
Leo Harris

How's this?

Adrian Morris
Adrian Morris

I haven't tried Illumos in a while, is it as easy to build yourself and update from source as FreeBSD yet? I'd like to use whatever is closest to Solaris with pkg-src, all the active forks seem to replace the userland with GNU.

Jacob Jones
Jacob Jones

Can you recommend any good books to read on Illumos or Solaris? I'm coming from FreeBSD so I can probably figure most things out but it would be nice to see proper documentation.

Matthew Perez
Matthew Perez

BSD Boyz looking for something like this
https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en/books/handbook/
but for Solaris

Alexander Gray
Alexander Gray

the HURD (a kernel that is better technically speaking)
I'm going to have to stop you right there.

The HURD has been in development for 20 years. If you have been working on a kernel (a well-understood component of operating systems, technically speaking) for 20 years it probably means that the design is wrong. It's too complex.

Oliver Watson
Oliver Watson

So far as I know, only building Illumos on any other Illumos/OpenSolaris system is supported. For the authentic OpenSolaris experience, OpenIndiana's goal is to remain faithful to the original OpenSolaris desktop distribution, so the userland in OpenIndiana should be Solaris. Another interesting hobby distro maintained by one Solaris engineer is Tribblix. SmartOS is a great guest hosting OS, as it leverages Solaris features to create the strongest OS-level virtualization platform available (Linux + Docker solutions still don't match the security of Zones). SmartOS includes LX-branded Zones, which are Linux binary compatible, so you can drop the whole userspace of CentOS or Debian into such a Zone and run it.

http://libgen.io/search.php?&req=Solaris&phrase=1&view=simple&column=def&sort=year&sortmode=DESC
OpenSolaris is Solaris 10 open-sourced. Oracle bought Sun Microsystems and re-closed Solaris for Solaris 11. That obviously doesn't 'delete' the OpenSolaris source and license, so OpenSolaris exists now as Illumos. Illumos is not fast-moving like Linux is, so like OpenBSD: books which are a few years dated are still relevant. Just disregard the Solaris Trusted Extensions and MLS-MAC stuff as that's been gutted. Maintaining MLS-MAC systems like that take extensive testing which is expensive, and really only governments/intelligence agencies use fine-grained classification systems like that. For example: I find it difficult finding literature on designing MLS-enabled systems and organizations using SELinux categories. Hell, searching for "mls" "SELinux" on google and youtube makes me cry inside.

Daniel Ramirez
Daniel Ramirez

Per OpenBSD, the best stuff is the man pages (after all, this is UNIX).

OpenIndiana online 'handbook' for example:
http://docs.openindiana.org/handbook/getting-started/

Nathaniel Wilson
Nathaniel Wilson

SmartOS is probably the most 'different' of the "Illumos distributions." It is a live system which you burn to disc or flash to thumbdrive and boot your server with (and can remove after booting). On first-boot, it uses available HDDs to create a zpool, asks some configuration questions, and reboots. Everything you do is in various Zones or VMs you create, as SmartOS is supposed to be a non-persistent hypervisor.

[Triton] SmartOS requirements are at least a gig of RAM minimum for a workable experience. The entire FOSS "private cloud" solution called Triton Smart DataCenter takes systems with a stated minimum of 16GB RAM (though I wouldn't be surprised if a hobbyist could squeak by with 8GB Dell i3/i5 clones). Triton SDC is Joyent's cloud infrastructure and glue-ware. You can deploy your own cloud OS across a [physically] freshly-deployed datacenter in as little as a couple hours. You bring up a head node with SDC boot media, and all other nodes are to PXE-boot their hypervisors from the head.

Anthony Jenkins
Anthony Jenkins

I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you’re referring to as MacOS (BSD), is in fact, XNU/BSD, or as I’ve recently taken to calling it, the XNU Open Software Foundation Mach Kernel plus BSD. BSD components are not a kernel unto themselves, but rather a set of free virtual filesystems, networking protocols, and system calls in a fully functioning kernel made useful by the XNU driver API, I/O KIT and vital system components comprising a full hybrid kernel as defined by Steven Jobs.

Chase Jenkins
Chase Jenkins

that saucy italian pasta

Jaxon Lewis
Jaxon Lewis

Thanks. Will look at those books tonight.

Hunter Butler
Hunter Butler

The HURD hasn't been in development for 20 years. It's development basically stopped for a whole decade and even today it doesn't even have a dozen of developers, and they have a lot of shit to catch up to.
Linux and kFreeBDS had way more developers in their initial years than the HURD in 20 years. Plus, hardware was arguably simpler.
The HURD does seem overly complex, though.

Juan Sullivan
Juan Sullivan

Alternatively, why not just run Solaris11, which is free for home users to "evaluate". Then at least you get encrypted zfs.

Jonathan Peterson
Jonathan Peterson

Is there any good reason to use Illumos over FreeBSD for a home server?

Brayden Mitchell
Brayden Mitchell

Aside being the pair of the lonely illumos fanboi in Holla Forums? Nothing.

Adrian Sanchez
Adrian Sanchez

BeOS

Posted from my OpenBSD box with links2.

Jackson Evans
Jackson Evans

I guess OpenBSD is the new Arch.

Elijah Howard
Elijah Howard

How?
Arch is for redditors, and focuses on customization, not correct C meme.

Jaxson Roberts
Jaxson Roberts

I think he meant that it's a distro people like to claim they use for credibility. Just as people claim to have read Donald Trump's Art of Computer Programming books.

Lucas Sanchez
Lucas Sanchez

System not release, I should say.

Nicholas Green
Nicholas Green

See picobsd and nanobsd.

Brandon Myers
Brandon Myers

But those systems are extremely minimal. The BSDs are fully usable Unix systems out of the box, with all of the Unix tools that you may find convenient pre-installed.

And we live in a world where 100GB of disk space is relatively little. It really doesn't matter how small your base system is.

Hunter Gonzalez
Hunter Gonzalez

Arch sucks. You really should be comparing Gentoo to OpenBSD.

Wyatt Green
Wyatt Green

How does a guy get wine working on the most current version of FreeBSD, amd64 platform? Some forums indicate the 2.0+ wine tree is fucked for 3d applications for FreeBSD, but that the 1.8.6 version is good. Saw a suggestion to revert the port, but it is too old now so that no longer works.

I have tried a few things but, can anyone tell me definitively how I should get wine to play some old pc games on amd64? Would switching to the i386 arch solve my problems?

Appreciate any guidance any of you fbsders might have.

Landon Jenkins
Landon Jenkins

/usr/ports/ports-mgmt/portdowngrade

Zachary Harris
Zachary Harris

Thanks for the suggestion. I tried that. The patches to go back to 1.8.6 (the last non-fucked version, apparently) are now too old -- when you try to downgrade the port to the appropriate revision, you get a note that says "this version is too old, command did not change the tree" or some such thing.

Am I missing a trick?

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